Charles Dickens Quotes Part 90

Charles Dickens Quotes Part 90: Charles John Huffam Dickens was an English writer and social critic. He created some of the world’s best-known fictional characters and is regarded by many as the greatest novelist of the Victorian era.

His works enjoyed unprecedented popularity during his lifetime and, by the 20th century, critics and scholars had recognised him as a literary genius. His novels and short stories are widely read today.

 

Charles Dickens Quotes Part 90

Charles dickens quotes

 

“Bad Fortune!” cries The Vengeance, stamping her foot in the chair, “and here are the tumbrils! And Evremonde will be despatched in a wink, and she not here! See her knitting in my hand, and her empty chair ready for her. I cry with vexation and disappointment!”
― Charles Dickens, A Tale of Two Cities

 

 

 

 

 

“Afraid, in her extreme perturbation, of the loneliness of the deserted rooms, and of half-imagined faces peeping from behind every open door in them, Miss Pross got a basin of cold water and began laving her eyes, which were swollen and red. Haunted by her feverish apprehensions, she could not bear to have her sight obscured for a minute at a time by the dripping”
― Charles Dickens, A Tale of Two Cities

 

 

 

 

 

“For certain, neither of them sees a happy Present, as the gate opens and closes, and one goes in, and the other goes away.”
― Charles Dickens, The Mystery of Edwin Drood

 

 

 

 

 

“The basin fell to the ground broken, and the water flowed to the feet of Madame Defarge. By strange stern ways, and through much staining blood, those feet had come to meet that water.”
― Charles Dickens, A Tale of Two Cities

 

 

 

Charles Dickens Quotes Part 90

 

 

“It flashed upon Miss Pross’s mind that the doors were all standing open, and would suggest the flight. Her first act was to shut them. There were four in the room, and she shut them all. She then placed herself before the door of the chamber which Lucie had occupied.”
― Charles Dickens, A Tale of Two Cities

 

 

 

 

 

“a smattering of everything, and a knowledge of nothing”
― Charles Dickens

 

 

 

 

 

“British subjects in America: which, strange to relate, have proved more important to the human race than any communications yet received through any”
― Charles Dickens, A Tale of Two Cities

 

 

 

 

 

 

“You might, from your appearance, be the wife of Lucifer,” said Miss Pross, in her breathing. “Nevertheless, you shall not get the better of me. I am an Englishwoman.”
― Charles Dickens, A Tale of Two Cities

 

 

Charles Dickens Quotes Part 90

 

 

“It was the best of times, it was the worst of times, it was the age of wisdom, it was the age of foolishness,”
― Charles Dickens, A Tale of Two Cities

 

 

 

 

 

“Each spoke in her own language; neither understood the other’s words; both were very watchful, and intent to deduce from look and manner, what the unintelligible words meant.”
― Charles Dickens, A Tale of Two Cities

 

 

 

 

 

“It’s this same habit that confirms some of us, who are capable of better things, in Lucifer’s own pride and stubbornness – that confirms and deepens others of us in villainy – more of us in indifference – that hardens us from day to day, according to the temper of our clay, like images, and leaves us as susceptible as images to new impressions and convictions.”
― Charles Dickens, Dombey and Son
“Every day of his life he had a long sitting at the Memorial, which never made the least progress, however hard he laboured, for King Charles the First always strayed into it, sooner or later, and then it was thrown aside, and another one begun. The patience and hope with which he bore these perpetual disappointments, the mild perception he had that there was something wrong about King Charles the First, the feeble efforts he made to keep him out, and the certainty with which he came in, and tumbled the Memorial out of all shape, made a deep impression on me….It was quite an affecting sight, I used to think, to see him with the kite when it was up a great height in the air. What he had told me, in his room, about his belief in its disseminating the statements pasted on it, which were nothing but old leaves of abortive Memorials, might have been a fancy with him sometimes; but not when he was out, looking up at the kite in the sky, and feeling it pull and tug at his hand. He never looked so serene as he did then. I used to fancy, as I sat by him of an evening, on a green slope, and saw him watch the kite high up in the quiet air, that it lifted his mind out of its confusion, and bore it (such was my boyish thought) into the skies. As he wound the string in, and it came lower and lower down out of the beautiful light, until it fluttered to the ground, and lay there like a dead thing, he seemed to wake gradually out of a dream; and I remember to have seen him take it up, and look about him in a lost way, as if they had both come down together, so that I pitied him with all my heart.”
― Charles Dickens, David Copperfield

 

Charles Dickens Quotes Part 90

 

 

“Clasped in my embrace, I held the source of every worthy aspiration I ever had; the centre of myself, the circle of my life, my own…my love of whom was founded on a rock!”
― Charles Dickens, David Copperfield

 

 

 

 

 

 

“It only shows how true the old saying is, that a man never knows what he can do till he tries, gentlemen. From “Pickwick Papers” ch. 49 page 646”
― Charles Dickens

 

Charles Dickens Quotes Part 90

 

 

“…it was one of those dark nights that hold their breath by the hour together, and then heave a long low sigh, and hold their breath again.”
― Charles Dickens, A Tale of Two Cities  

 

 

 

SEE MORE:

 

Leave a Comment