Charles Dickens Quotes Part 86

Charles Dickens Quotes Part 86: Charles John Huffam Dickens was an English writer and social critic. He created some of the world’s best-known fictional characters and is regarded by many as the greatest novelist of the Victorian era.

His works enjoyed unprecedented popularity during his lifetime and, by the 20th century, critics and scholars had recognised him as a literary genius. His novels and short stories are widely read today.

 

Charles Dickens Quotes Part 86

Charles dickens quotes

 

 

“Westminster. Even the Cock-lane ghost had been laid only a round dozen of years, after rapping out its messages, as the spirits of this very year last past (supernaturally”
― Charles Dickens, A Tale of Two Cities

 

 

 

 

 

 

“When this interchange of Christian name was effected, Madame Defarge, picking her teeth with her toothpick, coughed another grain of cough, and raised her eyebrows by the breadth of another line.”
― Charles Dickens, A Tale of Two Cities

 

 

 

 

 

 

“What the two drank together, between Hilary Term and Michaelmas, might have floated a king’s ship.”
― Charles Dickens, A Tale of Two Cities

 

 

 

Charles Dickens Quotes Part 86

 

 

“Then the strong-rooms underground, at Tellson’s, with such of their valuable stores and secrets as were known to the passenger (and it was not a little that he knew about them), opened before him, and he went in among them with the great keys and the feebly-burning candle, and found them safe, and strong, and sound, and still, just as he had last seen them.”
― Charles Dickens, A Tale of Two Cities

 

 

 

 

 

 

“The words were still in his hearing as just spoken—distinctly in his hearing as ever spoken words had been in his life—when the weary passenger started to the consciousness of daylight, and found that the shadows of the night were gone.”
― Charles Dickens, A Tale of Two Cities

 

 

 

 

 

 

“In seasons of pestilence, some of us will have a secret attraction to the disease—a terrible passing inclination to die of it. And all of us have like wonders hidden in our breasts, only needing circumstances to evoke them.”
― Charles Dickens, A Tale of Two Cities

 

 

Charles Dickens Quotes Part 86

 

 

 

“Besides which, all that I could have said of the Story to any purpose, I had endeavoured to say in it.”
― Charles Dickens, David Copperfield

 

 

 

 

 

 

“What is he to learn? To imitate? Or to avoid? When your friends the bees worry themselves about their sovereign, and become perfectly distracted touching the slightest monarchical movement, are we men to learn the greatness of Tuft-hunting, or the littleness of the Court Circular? I am not clear, Mr. Boffin, but that the hive may be satirical.’
At all events, they work,’ said Mr. Boffin.
Ye-es,’ returned Eugene, disparagingly, ‘they work; but don’t you think they overdo it?”
― Charles Dickens

 

 

 

 

 

 

“Southcott had recently attained her five-and-twentieth blessed birthday, of whom a prophetic private in the Life Guards had heralded the sublime appearance by announcing that arrangements were made for the swallowing”
― Charles Dickens, A Tale of Two Cities

 

 

Charles Dickens Quotes Part 86

 

 

 

“There could have been no such Revolution, if all laws, forms, and ceremonies, had not first been so monstrously abused, that the suicidal vengeance of the Revolution was to scatter them all to the winds.”
― Charles Dickens, A Tale of Two Cities

 

 

 

 

 

 

“It was the best of times, It was the worst of times.
It was the age of wisdom, It was the age of foolishness.
It was the epoch of belief, It was the epoch of incredulity.
It was the season of light, It was the season of darkness.
It was the spring of hope, It was the winter of despair.
We had everything before us, We had nothing before us.
We were all going direct to Heaven, We were all going direct the other way.”
― Charles Dickens, A Tale of Two Cities

 

 

 

 

 

 

“Sir Leicester általában önelégült hangulatban van, s ritkán unatkozik. Ha semmi mást nem tud kezdeni, mindig eltűnődhet saját nagyszerűségén. Nagy előnyt jelent az embernek, ha ilyen kimeríthetetlen tárggyal rendelkezik.”
― Charles Dickens, Bleak House

 

 

 

Charles Dickens Quotes Part 86

 

 

“And I wondered when I peeped into one or two on the lower tiers, and saw the tied-up brown paper packets inside, whether the flower-seeds and bulbs ever wanted of a fine day to break out of those jails, and bloom.”
― Charles Dickens, Great Expectations

 

 

 

 

 

 

“Suspected and Denounced enemy of the Republic, Aristocrat, one of a family of tyrants, one of a race proscribed, for that they had used their abolished privileges to the infamous oppression of the people. Charles Evremonde, called Darnay, in right of such proscription, absolutely Dead in Law.”
― Charles Dickens, A Tale of Two Cities

 

 

 

 

 

 

“A man may live to be as old as Methuselah,’ said Mr. Filer, ‘and may labour all his life for the benefit of such people as those; and may heap up facts on figures, facts on figures, facts on figures, mountains high and dry; and he can no more hope to persuade ’em that they have no right or business to be married, than he can hope to persuade ’em that they have no earthly right or business to be born. And that we know they haven’t. We reduced it to a mathematical certainty long ago!”
― Charles Dickens, The Chimes

 

 

Charles Dickens Quotes Part 86

 

 

 

“In England, there was scarcely an amount of order and protection to justify much national boasting. Daring burglaries by armed men, and highway robberies, took place in the capital itself every night; families were publicly cautioned not to go out of town without removing their furniture to upholsterers’ warehouses for security; the highwayman in the dark was a City tradesman in the light, and, being recognised and challenged by his fellow-tradesman whom he stopped in his”
― Charles Dickens, A Tale of Two Cities

 

 

 

 

 

 

“None of us clearly know to whom or to what we are indebted in this wise, until some marked stop in the whirling wheel of life brings the right perception with it.”
― Charles Dickens, Little Dorrit

 

 

 

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