Charles Dickens Quotes Part 85

Charles Dickens Quotes Part 85: Charles John Huffam Dickens was an English writer and social critic. He created some of the world’s best-known fictional characters and is regarded by many as the greatest novelist of the Victorian era.

His works enjoyed unprecedented popularity during his lifetime and, by the 20th century, critics and scholars had recognised him as a literary genius. His novels and short stories are widely read today.

 

Charles Dickens Quotes Part 85

Charles dickens quotes

 

 

 

“Whatsume’er the failings on his part, Remember reader he were that good in his hart.”
― Charles Dickens, Great Expectations

 

 

 

 

 

“Mr. Stryver then called his few witnesses, and Mr. Cruncher had next to attend while Mr. Attorney-General turned the whole suit of clothes Mr. Stryver had fitted on the jury, inside out; showing how Barsad and Cly were even a hundred times better than he had thought them, and the prisoner a hundred times worse. Lastly, came my Lord himself, turning the suit of clothes, now inside out, now outside in, but on the whole decidedly trimming and shaping them into grave-clothes for the prisoner.”
― Charles Dickens, A Tale of Two Cities

 

 

 

 

 

 

“In good time she made tea; and afterwards, when I brought down my books, looked into them, and showed me what she knew of them (which was no slight matter, though she said it was), and what was the best way to learn and understand them. I see her, with her modest, orderly, placid manner, and I hear her beautiful calm voice, as I write these words. The influence for all good, which she came to exercise over me at a later time, begins already to descend upon my breast. I love little Em’ly, and I don’t love Agnes—no, not at all in that way—but I feel that there are goodness, peace, and truth, wherever Agnes is; and that the soft light of the coloured window in the church, seen long ago, falls on her always, and on me when I am near her, and on everything around.”
― Charles Dickens, David Copperfield

 

 

Charles Dickens Quotes Part 85

 

 

“She had reasons for believing that there was a young sister living, and her greatest desire was, to help that sister.”
― Charles Dickens, A Tale of Two Cities

 

 

 

 

“Your manners have been of that silent and sullen and hangdog kind, that, upon my life and soul, I have been ashamed of you, Sydney!”
― Charles Dickens, A Tale of Two Cities

 

 

 

 

 

 

“What else can I be,” returned the uncle, “when I live in such a world of fools as this? Merry Christmas! Out upon merry Christmas! What’s Christmas time to you but a time for paying bills without money; a time for finding yourself a year older, but not an hour richer; a time for balancing your books and having every item in ’em through a round dozen of months presented dead against you? If I could work my will,” said Scrooge indignantly, “every idiot who goes about with ‘Merry Christmas’ on his lips, should be boiled with his own pudding, and buried with a stake of holly through his heart. He should!”
― Charles Dickens, A Christmas Carol

 

 

 

 

 

 

“Depressed and slinking though they were, eyes of fire were not wanting among them; nor compressed lips, white with what they suppressed”
― Charles Dickens, A Tale of Two Cities

 

 

 

Charles Dickens Quotes Part 85

 

 

“It was characteristic of this lady (as of some other people before her time and since) that whenever her original proposition was questioned, she exaggerated it.”
― Charles Dickens, A Tale of Two Cities

 

 

 

 

 

“It is the fate of all authors or chroniclers to create imaginary friends, and lose them in the course of art.”
― Charles Dickens, The Pickwick Papers

 

 

 

 

 

“My husband. No! A moment!” He was tearing himself apart from her. “We shall not be separated long. I feel that this will break my heart by-and-bye; but I will do my duty while I can, and when I leave her, God will raise up friends for her, as He did for me.” Her father had followed her, and would have fallen on his knees to both of them, but that Darnay put out a hand and seized him, crying: “No, no! What have you done, what have you done, that you should kneel to us! We know now, what a struggle you made of old. We know, now what you underwent when you suspected my descent, and when you knew it. We know now, the natural antipathy you strove against, and conquered, for her dear sake. We thank you with all our hearts, and all our love and duty. Heaven be with you!” Her father’s only answer was to draw his hands through his white hair, and wring them with a shriek of anguish.”
― Charles Dickens, A Tale of Two Cities

 

 

 

 

 

 

“had everything before us, we had nothing before us, we were all going direct to Heaven, we were all”
― Charles Dickens, A Tale of Two Cities

 

 

Charles Dickens Quotes Part 85

 

 

“A kind and generous man by nature, he had stumbled, by chance, over that common Philosopher`s stone (much more easily discovered than the object of the alchemist`s researches), which sometimes trips up kind and generous men, and has the fatal property of turning gold to dross and every precious thing to poor account.”
― Charles Dickens, The Battle of Life

 

 

 

 

 

“Papa is a preferable mode of address’, observed Mrs General. ‘Father is rather vulgar, my dear. The word Papa, besides, gives a pretty form to the lips. Papa, potatoes, poultry, prunes and prism, are all very good words for the lips: especially prunes and prism. You will find it serviceable, in the formation of a demeanour, if you sometimes say to yourself in company – on entering a room, for instance – Papa, potatoes, poultry, prunes and prism.”
― Charles Dickens, Little Dorrit

 

 

Charles Dickens Quotes Part 85

 

 

“To have all those noble Romans alive before me, and walking in and out for my entertainment, instead of being the stern taskmasters they had been at school, was a most novel and delightful effect.”
― Charles Dickens, David Copperfield

 

 

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