Charles Dickens Quotes Part 80

Charles Dickens Quotes Part 80: Charles John Huffam Dickens was an English writer and social critic. He created some of the world’s best-known fictional characters and is regarded by many as the greatest novelist of the Victorian era.

His works enjoyed unprecedented popularity during his lifetime and, by the 20th century, critics and scholars had recognised him as a literary genius. His novels and short stories are widely read today.

 

Charles Dickens Quotes Part 80

Charles dickens quotes

 

 

“No more can I turn the leaves of this dear book that I loved, and vainly hope in time to read it all. No more can I lookj into the depths of thif unfathomable wather, wherein, as momentary lights glanced nto it, I have had glimpses of buried treasure and other things submerged.”
― Charles Dickens, A Tale of Two Cities

 

 

 

 

“mist in all the hollows, and it had roamed in its forlornness up the hill, like an evil spirit, seeking rest and finding none. A clammy and intensely cold mist, it made its slow way through the air in ripples that visibly followed and overspread one another, as the waves of an unwholesome sea might do. It was dense enough to shut out everything from the light of the coach-lamps but these its own workings, and a few yards of road; and the reek of the labouring horses steamed into it, as if they had made it all.”
― Charles Dickens, A Tale of Two Cities

 

 

 

 

“In England, there was scarcely an amount of order and protection to justify much national boasting. Daring burglaries by armed men, and highway robberies,”
― Charles Dickens, A Tale of Two Cities

 

Charles Dickens Quotes Part 80

 

“IV. Congratulatory V. The Jackal VI. Hundreds of People VII. Monseigneur in Town VIII. Monseigneur in the Country”
― Charles Dickens, A Tale of Two Cities

 

 

 

“these accidental parties are always the pleasantest,”
― Charles Dickens, The Old Curiosity Shop

 

 

 

 

 

“He gave it its present name, and lived here shut up: day and night poring over the wicked heaps of papers in the suit, and hoping against hope to disentangle it from its mystification and bring it to a close. In the meantime, the place became dilapidated, the wind whistled through the cracked walls, the rain fell through the broken roof, the weeds choked the passage to the rotting door. When I brought what remained of him home here, the brains seemed to me to have been blown out of the house too; it was so shattered and ruined.”
― Charles Dickens, Bleak House

 

 

 

 

 

 

“All other swindlers upon earth are nothing to the self-swindlers, and with such pretences did I cheat myself. Surely a curious thing. That I should innocently take a bad half-crown of somebody else’s manufacture, is reasonable enough; but that I should knowingly reckon the spurious coin of my own make, as good money! An obliging stranger, under pretence of compactly folding up my bank-notes for security’s sake, abstracts the notes and gives me nutshells; but what is his sleight of hand to mine, when I fold up my own nutsells and pass them on myself as notes!”
― Charles Dickens, Great Expectations

 

 

Charles Dickens Quotes Part 80

 

 

“He was touched in the cavity where his heart should have been, in that nest of addled eggs, where the birds of heaven would have lived if they had not been whistled away, by the fervour of this reproach.”
― Charles Dickens

 

 

 

“All these things, and a thousand like them, came to pass in and close upon the dear old year one”
― Charles Dickens, A Tale of Two Cities

 

 

 

 

“My meaning is, that no man can expect his children to respect what he degrades.”
― Charles Dickens, Martin Chuzzlewit

 

 

 

 

 

“Ah, rather overdone, M’Choakumchild.  If he had only learnt a little less, how infinitely better he might have taught much more!”
― Charles Dickens, Hard Times

 

 

Charles Dickens Quotes Part 80

 

 

 

“France, less favoured on the whole as to matters spiritual than her sister of the shield and trident, rolled with exceeding smoothness down hill, making paper money and spending it. Under the guidance of her Christian pastors, she entertained herself, besides, with such humane achievements as sentencing a youth to have his hands cut off, his tongue torn out with pincers, and his body burned alive, because he had not kneeled down in the rain to do honour to a dirty procession of monks which passed within his view, at a distance of some fifty or sixty yards. It is likely enough that, rooted in the woods of France and Norway, there were growing trees, when that sufferer was put to death, already marked by the Woodman, Fate, to come down and be sawn into boards, to make a certain movable framework with a sack and a knife in it, terrible in history. It is likely enough that in the rough outhouses of some tillers of the heavy lands adjacent to Paris, there were sheltered from the weather that very day, rude carts, bespattered with rustic mire, snuffed about by pigs, and roosted in by poultry, which the Farmer, Death, had already set apart to be his tumbrils of the Revolution. But that Woodman and that Farmer, though they work unceasingly, work silently, and no one heard them as they went about with muffled tread: the rather, forasmuch as to entertain any suspicion that they were awake, was to be atheistical and traitorous.”
― Charles Dickens, A Tale of Two Cities

 

 

 

 

“clearer than crystal to the lords of the State preserves of loaves and fishes, that things in general were settled for ever. It was the”
― Charles Dickens, A Tale of Two Cities

 

 

Charles Dickens Quotes Part 80

 

 

“(On finding love later in life)
“Let’s be a comfortable couple, and take care of each other! And if we should get deaf, or lame, or blind, or bed-ridden, how glad we shall be that we have somebody we are fond of, always to talk to and sit with! Let’s be a comfortable couple. Now do, my dear!”
― Charles Dickens, Nicholas Nickleby

 

 

 

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