Charles Dickens Quotes Part 57

Charles Dickens Quotes Part 57: Charles John Huffam Dickens was an English writer and social critic. He created some of the world’s best-known fictional characters and is regarded by many as the greatest novelist of the Victorian era.

His works enjoyed unprecedented popularity during his lifetime and, by the 20th century, critics and scholars had recognised him as a literary genius. His novels and short stories are widely read today.

 

Charles Dickens Quotes Part 57

Charles dickens quotes

 

“With that, she pounced upon me, like an eagle on a lamb, and my face was squeezed into wooden bowls in sinks, and my head was put under taps of water-butts, and I was soaped, and kneaded, and towelled, and thumped, and harrowed, and rasped, until I really was quite beside myself. (I may here remark that I suppose myself to be better acquainted than any living authority, with the ridgy effect of a wedding-ring, passing unsympathetically over the human countenance.)”
― Charles Dickens, Great Expectations

 

 

 

 

“Scattered wits take a long time picking up; and often before I had got them well together, they would be dispersed in all directions by one stray thought,”
― Charles Dickens, Great Expectations

 

 

 

“Old Marley was as dead as a door-nail.”
― Charles Dickens, A Christmas Carol

 

 

 

“The misery with them all was, clearly, that they sought to interfere, for good, in human matters, and had lost the power for ever.”
― Charles Dickens, A Christmas Carol

 

Charles Dickens Quotes Part 57

 

“It is indeed a much greater thing that I do now than I have ever done.”
― Charles Dickens, A Tale of Two Cities

 

 

 

“The dreams of childhood—its airy fables; its graceful, beautiful, humane, impossible adornments of the world beyond: so good to be believed-in once, so good to be remembered when outgrown, for the least among them rises to the stature of a great Charity in the heart, suffering the little children to come into the midst of it, and to keep with their pure hands a garden in the stony ways of this world”
― Charles Dickens, Hard Times

 

 

 

 

“What a situation!’ cried Miss Squeers; ‘…What is the reason that men fall in love with me, whether I like it or not, and desert their chosen intendeds for my sake?’
‘Because they can’t help it, miss,’ replied the girl; ‘the reason’s plain.’ (If Miss Squeers were the reason, it was very plain.)”
― Charles Dickens, Nicholas Nickleby

 

 

 

 

“…let it be remembered that most men live in a world of their own, and that in that limited circle alone are they ambitious for distinction and applause. Sir Mulberry’s world was peopled with profligates, and he acted accordingly.

Thus, cases of injustice, and oppression, and tyranny, and the most extravagant bigotry, are in constant occurrence among us every day. It is the custom to trumpet forth much wonder and astonishment at the chief actors therein setting at defiance so completely the opinion of the world. But there is no greater fallacy; it is precisely because they do consult the opinion of their own little world that such things take place at all, and strike the great world dumb with amazement.”
― Charles Dickens, Nicholas Nickleby

 

Charles Dickens Quotes Part 57

 

 

“To the eye it is fair enough, here; but seen in its integrity, under the sky, and by the daylight, it is a crumbling tower of waste, mismanagement, extortion, debt, mortgage, oppression, hunger, nakedness, and suffering.”
― Charles Dickens, A Tale of Two Cities

 

 

 

 

“What an unsubstantial, happy, foolish time! Of all the times of mine that Time has in his grip, there is none that in one retrospection I can smile at half so much, and think of half so tenderly.”
― Charles Dickens, David Copperfield

 

 

 

 

“Morning made a considerable difference in my general prospects of Life and brightened it so much that is scarcely seemed the same.”
― Charles Dickens, Great Expectations

 

 

 

 

“Thus did the year one thousand seven hundred and seventy-five conduct their Greatnesses, and myriads of small creatures—the creatures of this chronicle among the rest—along the roads that lay before them.”
― Charles Dickens, A Tale of Two Cities

 

Charles Dickens Quotes Part 57

 

 

“The beach was a desert of heaps of sea and stones tumbling wildly about, and the sea did what it liked, and what it liked was destruction.”
― Charles Dickens, A Tale of Two Cities

 

 

 

“It was the best of times, it was the worst of times…”
― Charles Dickens, A Tale of Two Cities

 

 

 

 

“The inhabitants of Cincinnati are proud of their city as one of the most interesting in America: and with good reason.”
― Charles Dickens, American Notes For General Circulation

 

 

 

 

“It was nothing to her, that an innocent man was to die for the sins of his forefathers; she saw, not him, but them. It was nothing to her, that his wife was to be made a widow and his daughter an orphan; that was insufficient punishment, because they were her natural enemies and her prey, and as such had no right to live. To appeal to her, was made hopeless by her having no sense of pity, even for herself. If she had been laid low in the streets, in any of the many encounters in which she had been engaged, she would not have pitied herself; nor, if she had been ordered to the axe to-morrow, would she have gone to it with any softer feeling than a fierce desire to change places with the man who sent her there.”
― Charles Dickens, A Tale of Two Cities

 

 

Charles Dickens Quotes Part 57

 

“Bless me, yes. There he is. He was very much attached to me, was Dick. Poor Dick! Dear, dear!”
― Charles Dickens, A Christmas Carol

 

 

 

 

 

“Because the memory of those who lie below, passes away so soon. At first they tend them, morning, noon, and night; they soon begin to come less frequently; from once a day, to once a week; from once a week to once a month; then, at long and uncertain intervals; then, not at all. Such tokens seldom flourish long. I have known the briefest summer flowers outlive them.”
― Charles Dickens, The Old Curiosity Shop

 

 

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