Charles Dickens Quotes Part 55

Charles Dickens Quotes Part 55: Charles John Huffam Dickens was an English writer and social critic. He created some of the world’s best-known fictional characters and is regarded by many as the greatest novelist of the Victorian era.

His works enjoyed unprecedented popularity during his lifetime and, by the 20th century, critics and scholars had recognised him as a literary genius. His novels and short stories are widely read today.

 

Charles Dickens Quotes Part 55

Charles dickens quotes

 

 

“Indeed, as he eagerly sparkled at them from the cellarage before mentioned, he seemed a kind of cannon loaded to the muzzle with facts, and prepared to blow them clean out of the regions of childhood at one discharge. He seemed a galvanizing apparatus, too, charged with a grim mechanical substitute for the tender young imaginations that were to be stormed away.”
― Charles Dickens, Hard Times

 

 

 

 

“They said of him, about the city that night, that it was the peacefullest man’s face ever beheld there. Many added that he looked sublime and prophetic.”
― Charles Dickens, A Tale of Two Cities

 

 

 

 

“We owed so much to Herbert’s ever cheerful industry and readiness, that I often wondered how I had conceived that old idea of his inaptitude, until I was one day enlightened by the reflection, that perhaps the inaptitude had never been in him at all, but had been in me.”
― Charles Dickens, Great Expectations

 

Charles Dickens Quotes Part 55

 

 

“The sudden and uncalled for coldness with which you treated me just before I left last night, both surprised and deeply hurt me – surprised because I could not have believed that such sullen and inflexible obstinacy could exist in the breast of any girl in whose heart love had found place; and hurt me, because I feel for you more than I have ever professed and feel a slight from you more than I care to tell.

My object in writing to you is this: if hasty temper produces this strange behaviour, acknowledge it when I give you the opportunity – not once or twice, but again and again. If a feeling of you know not what – a capricious restlessness of you can’t tell what, and a desire to tease, you don’t know why, give rise to it – overcome it; it will never make you more amiable, I more fond or either of us, more happy. Depend upon it, whatever be the cause of your unkindness – whatever gives rise to these wayward fancies – that what you do not take the trouble to conceal from a Lover’s eyes, will be frequently acted before those of a husband’s.

I know as well, as if I were by your side at this moment, that your present impulse on reading this letter is one of anger – pride perhaps, or to use a word more current with your sex – ‘spirit’. My dear girl, I have not the most remote intention of awakening any such feeling, and I implore you, not to entertain it for an instant…. I have written these few lines in haste, but not anger…. If you knew but half the anxiety with which I watched your recent illness, the joy with which I hailed your recovery, and the eagerness with which I would promote your happiness, you could more readily understand the extent of the pain so easily inflicted, but so difficult to be forgotten.

– Excerpts from a letter by Charles Dickens to his fiancee of three weeks, 1835”

― Charles Dickens

 

 

Charles Dickens Quotes Part 55

 

 

“There are noble mausoleums rooted for centuries in retired glades of parks among the growing timber and the fern, which perhaps hold fewer noble secrets than walk abroad among men, shut up in the breast of Mr. Tulkinghorn.”
― Charles Dickens, Bleak House

 

 

 

 

“A wonderful fact to reflect upon, that every human creature is constituted to be that profound secret and mystery to every other. A solemn consideration, when I enter a great city by night, that every one of those darkly clustered houses encloses its own secret; that every room in every one of them encloses its own secret; that every beating heart in the hundreds of thousands of breasts there, is, in some of its imaginings, a secret to the heart nearest it! Something”
― Charles Dickens, A Tale of Two Cities

 

 

 

 

“But why do spirits walk the earth, and why do they come to me?”
“It is required of every man,” the Ghost returned, “that the spirit within him should walk abroad among his fellow-men, and travel far and wide; and if that spirit goes not forth in life, it is condemned to do so after death. It is doomed to wander through the world–oh, woe is me!–and witness what it cannot share, but might have shared on earth, and turned to happiness!
…I cannot rest, I cannot stay, I cannot linger anywhere. My spirit never roved beyond the narrow limits of our money-changing hole; and weary journeys lie before me!”
― Charles Dickens, A Christmas Carol

 

Charles Dickens Quotes Part 55

 

“Anything to vary this detestable monotony.”
― Charles Dickens, Bleak House

 

 

 

“And so, as Tiny Tim observed, God bless Us, Every One!”
― Charles Dickens, A Christmas Carol

 

 

 

 

“Yet a gentleman may not keep a public house; may he?’ said I. ‘Not on any account,’ returned Herbert; ‘but a public-house may keep a gentleman…”
― Charles Dickens, Great Expectations

 

 

 

“Only twice more did the housekeeper reappear, and then her stay in the room was very short, and Mr. Jaggers was sharp with her. But her hands were Estella’s hands, and her eyes were Estella’s eyes…”
― Charles Dickens, Great Expectations

 

Charles Dickens Quotes Part 55

 

“It is too late for that. I shall never be better than I am. I shall sink lower, and be worse.”
― Charles Dickens, A Tale of Two Cities

 

 

 

 

“    A mob is usually a creature of very mysterious existence, particularly in a large city. Where it comes from or whither it goes, few men can tell. Assembling and dispersing with equal suddenness, it is as difficult to follow to its various sources as the sea itself; nor does the parallel stop here, for the ocean is not more fickle and uncertain, more terrible when roused, more unreasonable, or more cruel.”
― Charles Dickens, Barnaby Rudge

 

 

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