Charles Dickens Quotes Part 43

Charles Dickens Quotes Part 43: Charles John Huffam Dickens was an English writer and social critic. He created some of the world’s best-known fictional characters and is regarded by many as the greatest novelist of the Victorian era.

His works enjoyed unprecedented popularity during his lifetime and, by the 20th century, critics and scholars had recognised him as a literary genius. His novels and short stories are widely read today.

 

Charles Dickens Quotes Part 43

Charles dickens quotes

 

 

“The pony preserved his character for independence and principle down to the last moment of his life; which was an unusually long one, and caused him to be looked upon, indeed, as the very Old Parr of ponies. He often went to and fro with the little phaeton between Mr. Garland’s and his son’s, and, as the old people and the young were frequently together, had a stable of his own at the new establishment, into which he would walk of himself with surprising dignity. He condescended to play with the children, as they grew old enough to cultivate his friendship, and would run up and down the little paddock with them like a dog; but though he relaxed so far, and allowed them such freedoms as caresses, or even to look at his shoes or hang on by his tail, he never permitted anyone among them to mount his back or drive him; thus showing that even their familiarity must have its limits, and that there were points between them far too serious for trifling.
He was not unsusceptible of warm attachments in his later life, for when the good Bachelor came to live with Mr. Garland upon the clergyman’s decease, he conceived a great friendship for him, and amiably submitted to be driven by his hands without the least resistance. He did no work for two or three years before he died, but lived on clover; and his last act (like a choleric old gentleman) was to kick his doctor.”
― Charles Dickens, The Old Curiosity Shop

 

 

 

 

 

“There was nothing very cheerful in the climate or the town, and yet was there an air of cheerfulness abroad that the clearest summer air and brightest summer sun might have endeavoured to diffuse in vain.”
― Charles Dickens, A Christmas Carol

 

 

 

 

“A man would die tonight of lying out on the marshes, I thought. And then I looked at the stars, and considered how awful it would be for a man to turn his face up to them as he froze to death, and see no help or pitty in all the glittering multitude.”
― Charles Dickens, Great Expectations

 

 

Charles Dickens Quotes Part 43

 

“My advice is, never do to-morrow what you can do to-day”
― Charles Dickens, David Copperfield

 

 

 

 

“Sir Leicester is generally in a complacent state, and rarely bored. When he has nothing else to do, he can always contemplate his own greatness. It is a considerable advantage to a man to have so inexhaustible a subject.”
― Charles Dickens, Bleak House

 

 

 

 

“He has got his discharge, by G-! said the man.
He had. But he had grown so like death in life, that they knew not when he died.”
― Charles Dickens, The Pickwick Papers

 

 

 

 

 

“All this time I had never been able to consider my own situation, nor could I do so yet. I had not the power to attend to it. I was greatly dejected and distressed, but in an incoherent wholesale sort of way. As to forming any plan for the future, I could as soon have formed an elephant. When I opened the shutters and looked out at the wet wild morning, all of a leaden hue; when I walked from room to room; when I sat down again shivering, before the fire, waiting for my laundress to appear; I thought how miserable I was, but hardly knew why, or how long I had been so, or on what day of the week I made the reflection, or even who I was that made it.”
― Charles Dickens, Great Expectations

 

Charles Dickens Quotes Part 43

 

 

“Mr. Pickwick gazed through his spectacles for an instant on the advancing mass, and then fairly turned his back and — we will not say fled; firstly because it is an ignoble term, and, secondly, because Mr. Pickwick’s figure was by no means adapted for that mode of retreat…”
― Charles Dickens, The Pickwick Papers

 

 

 

 

 

“As the elms bent to one another, like giants who were whispering secrets, and after a few seconds of such repose fell into a violent flurry, tossing their wild arms about, as if their late confidences were really too wicked for their peace of mind, some weather-beaten, ragged old rooks’ nests, burdening their higher branches, swung like wrecks upon a stormy sea.”
― Charles Dickens, David Copperfield

 

 

 

 

“So he whistles it off, and marches on”
― Charles Dickens, Bleak House

 

 

 

 

“The air among the houses was of so strong a piscatory flavour that one might have supposed sick fish went up to be dipped in it, as sick people went down to be dipped in the sea.”
― Charles Dickens, A Tale of Two Cities

 

 

 

“Herbert received me with open arms, and I had never felt before so blessedly what it is to have a friend. When he had spoken some sound words of sympathy and encouragement, we sat down to consider the question, What was to be done?”
― Charles Dickens, Great Expectations

 

 

Charles Dickens Quotes Part 43

 

“Upon which, every man looked at his neighbour, and then all cast down their eyes and sat silent. Except one man, who got up and went out.”
― Charles Dickens, A Tale of Two Cities

 

 

 

 

“There are many things which I might have derived good, by which I have not profited”
― Charles Dickens, A Christmas Carol

 

 

 

 

“She must have made Joe Gargery marry her by hand.”
― Charles Dickens, Great Expectations

 

 

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