Charles Dickens Quotes Part 41

Charles Dickens Quotes Part 41: Charles John Huffam Dickens was an English writer and social critic. He created some of the world’s best-known fictional characters and is regarded by many as the greatest novelist of the Victorian era.

His works enjoyed unprecedented popularity during his lifetime and, by the 20th century, critics and scholars had recognised him as a literary genius. His novels and short stories are widely read today.

 

Charles Dickens  Quotes Part 41

Charles dickens quotes

 

“Scrooge followed to the window: desperate in his curiosity. He looked out. The air was filled with phantoms, wandering hither and thither in restless haste, and moaning as they went. Every one of them wore chains like Marley’s Ghost; some few (they might be guilty governments) were linked together; none were free. Many had been personally known to Scrooge in their lives. He had been quite familiar with one old ghost, in a white waistcoat, with a monstrous iron safe attached to its ankle, who cried piteously at being unable to assist a wretched woman with an infant, whom it saw below, upon a door-step. The misery with them all was, clearly, that they sought to interfere, for good, in human matters, and had lost the power for ever.”
― Charles Dickens, A Christmas Carol

 

 

 

 

“Satan finds some mischief still, for idle hands to do’…He might have written with as much truth, ‘Satan finds some mischief for busy hands too.’ The busy people achieve their full share of mischief in the world, you may rely upon it. What have the people been about, who have been the busiest in getting money, and in getting power, this century or two? No mischief?”
― Charles Dickens

 

 

 

 

“Every man’s his own friend, my dear,” replied Fagin, with his most insinuating grin. “He hasn’t as good a one as himself anywhere.”
Except sometimes,” replied Morris Bolter, assuming the air of a man of the world. “Some people are nobody’s enemies but their own, yer know.”
Don’t believe that!” said the Jew. “When a man’s his own enemy, it’s only because he’s too much his own friend; not because he’s careful for everybody but himself. Pooh! Pooh! There ain’t such a thing in nature.”
― Charles Dickens, Oliver Twist

 

 

 

 

“Oh, but reasoning is so much worse than scolding!… I didn’t marry to be reasoned with. If you meant to reason with such a poor little thing as I am, you ought to have told me so, you cruel boy!”
― Charles Dickens, David Copperfield

 

Charles Dickens  Quotes Part 41

 

 

“And you, being a good man, can pass it as such, and forgive and pity the dreamer, and be lenient and encouraging when he wakes?” –Rick
“Indeed I can. What am I but another dreamer, Rick?” –Guardian”
― Charles Dickens, Bleak House

 

 

 

 

“She stood looking at me, and, of course, I stood looking at her.
“Am I pretty?”
“Yes; I think you are very pretty.”
“Am I insulting?”
“Not so much so as you were last time,” said I.
“Not so much so?”
“No.”
She fired when she asked the last question, and she slapped my face with such force as she had, when I answered it.
“Now,” said she. “You little course monster, what do you think of me now?”
“I shall not tell you.”
“Because you are going to tell upstairs. Is that it?”
“No,” said I. “That is not it.”
“Why don’t you cry again, you little wretch?”
“Because I’ll never cry for you again,” said I.”
― Charles Dickens

 

 

 

 

“That, for these reasons, the jury, being a loyal jury (as he knew they were), and being a responsible jury (as they knew they were), must positively find the prisoner Guilty, and make an end of him, whether they liked it or not. That, they never could lay their heads upon their pillows; that, they never could tolerate the idea of their wives laying their heads upon their pillows; that, they never could endure the notion of their children laying their heads upon their pillows; in short, that there never more could be, for them or theirs, any laying of heads upon pillows at all, unless the prisoner’s head was taken off.”
― Charles Dickens, A Tale of Two Cities

 

 

 

“We must have humbug, we all like humbug, we couldn’t get on without humbug.”
― Charles Dickens, Little Dorrit

 

 

 

“I hope I know my own unworthiness, and that I hate and despise myself and all my fellow-creatures as every practicable Christian should.”
― Charles Dickens, Barnaby Rudge

 

Charles Dickens  Quotes Part 41

 

“Never do tomorrow what you can do today. Procrastination is the thief of time.”
― Charles Dickens, David Copperfield

 

 

 

 

“When the Devil goeth about like a roaring lion, he goeth about in a shape by which few but savages and hunters are attracted. But, when he is trimmed, smoothed, and varnished, according to the mode: when he is aweary of vice, and aweary of virtue, used up as to brimstone, and used up as to bliss; then, whether he take to the serving out of red tape, or to the kindling of red fire, he is the very Devil.”
― Charles Dickens, Hard Times

 

 

 

 

“Money can’t buy a happy life, or a peaceful death.”
― Charles Dickens, A Christmas Carol

 

 

 

 

“Your memory does me more honour than my insignificance deserves.”
― Charles Dickens

 

 

 

“I am as light as a feather, I am as happy as an angel, I am as merry as a school-boy. I am as giddy as a drunken man.”
― Charles Dickens, A Christmas Carol

 

 

 

 

“I was attentive to my knife and fork, spoon, glasses, and other instruments of self-destruction…”
― Charles Dickens, Great Expectations

 

Charles Dickens  Quotes Part 41

 

 

“Chateau and hut, stone face and dangling figure, the red stain on the stone floor, and the pure water in the village well–thousands of acres of land–a whole province of France–all France itself–lay under the night sky, concentrated into a faint hairbreadth line. So does a whole world, with all its greatnesses and littlenesses, lie in a twinkling star. And as mere human knowledge can split a ray of light and analyse the manner of its composition, so, sublimer intelligences may read in the feeble shining of this earth of ours, every thought and act, every vice and virtue, of every responsible creature on it.”
― Charles Dickens, A Tale of Two Cities

 

 

 

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