Charles Dickens Quotes Part 37

Charles Dickens Quotes Part 37: Charles John Huffam Dickens was an English writer and social critic. He created some of the world’s best-known fictional characters and is regarded by many as the greatest novelist of the Victorian era.

His works enjoyed unprecedented popularity during his lifetime and, by the 20th century, critics and scholars had recognised him as a literary genius. His novels and short stories are widely read today.

 

Charles Dickens Quotes Part 37

Charles dickens quotes

 

“…a lady of what is commonly called an uncertain temper
–a phrase which being interpreted signifies a temper tolerably certain to make
everybody more or less uncomfortable.”
― Charles Dickens, Barnaby Rudge

 

 

 

 

“the United Metropolitan Improved Hot Muffin and Crumpet Baking and Punctual Delivery Company.”
― Charles Dickens, Nicholas Nickleby

 

 

 

 

“Fairy-land to visit, but a desert to live in”
― Charles Dickens, Bleak House

 

 

 

“What is the secret, my darling, of your being everything to all of us, as if there werre only one of us, yet never seeming to be hurried, or to have too much to do?
-Darney to Lucie”
― Charles Dickens, A Tale of Two Cities

 

Charles Dickens Quotes Part 37

 

 

“Such is hope, Heaven’s own gift to struggling mortals; pervading, like some subtle essence from the skies, all things, both good and bad; as universal as death, and more infectious than disease!”
― Charles Dickens, Nicholas Nickleby

 

 

 

 

“…a sea to intensely blue to be looked at, and a sky of purple, set with one great flaming jewel of fire…”
― Charles Dickens, Little Dorrit

 

 

 

 

“The present representative of the Dedlocks is an excellent master. He supposes all his dependents to be utterly bereft of individual characters, intentions, or opinions, and is persuaded that he was born to supersede the necessity of their having any. If he were to make a discovery to the contrary, he would be simply stunned — would never recover himself, most likely, except to gasp and die.”
― Charles Dickens, Bleak House

 

 

 

 

“When they coughed, they coughed like people accustomed to be forgotten on doorsteps and in draughty passages, waiting for answers to letters in faded ink . . .”
― Charles Dickens, Little Dorrit

 

 

 

 

“… Implacable November weather. As much mud in the streets, as if the waters had but newly retired from the face of the earth, and it would not be wonderful to meet a Megalosaurus, forty feet long or so, waddling like an elephantine lizard up Holborn Hill. Smoke lowering down from chimney-pots, making a soft black drizzle, with flakes of soot in it as big as full-grown snow-flakes — gone into mourning, one might imagine, for the death of the sun. Dogs, undistinguishable in mire. Horses, scarcely better; splashed to their very blinkers. Foot passengers, jostling one another’s umbrellas, in a general infection of ill-temper, and losing their foot-hold at street-corners, where tens of thousands of other foot passengers have been slipping and sliding since the day broke (if the day ever broke), adding new deposits to the crust upon crust of mud, sticking at those points tenaciously to the pavement, and accumulating at compound interest.”
― Charles Dickens, Bleak House

 

 

 

 

“I am sorry for him; I couldn’t be
angry with him if I tried. Who suffers by his ill whims? Himself always.
Here he takes it into his head to dislike us, and he won’t come and dine
with us. What’s the consequence? He don’t lose much of a dinner.”
“Indeed, I think he loses a very good dinner,” interrupted Scrooge’s
niece. Everybody else said the same, and they must be allowed to have
been competent judges, because they had just had dinner; and, with the
dessert upon the table, were clustered round the fire, by lamp-light.”
― Charles Dickens, A Christmas Carol

 

Charles Dickens Quotes Part 37

 

 

“Towards that small and ghostly hour, [Mr. Cruncher] rose up from his chair, took a key out of his pocket, opened a locked cupboard, and brought forth a sack, a crowbar of convenient size, a rope and chain, and other fishing tackle of that nature.”
― Charles Dickens, A Tale of Two Cities

 

 

 

“…the one woman who had stood conspicuous, knitting, still knitted on with the steadfastness of Fate.”
― Charles Dickens, A Tale of Two Cities

 

 

 

“Waste forces within him, and a desert all around, this man stood still on his way across a silent terrace, and saw for a moment, lying in the wilderness before him, a mirage of honourable ambition, self-denial, and perseverance. In the fair city of this vision, there were airy galleries from which the loves and graces looked upon him, gardens in which the fruits of life hung ripening, waters of Hope that sparkled in his sight. A moment and it was gone. Climbing to a high chamber in a well of houses, he threw himself down in his clothes on a neglected bed, and its pillow was wet with wasted tears.”
― Charles Dickens, A Tale of Two Cities

 

 

 

 

“Remember how strong we are in our happiness and how weak he is in his misery!”
― Charles Dickens, A Tale of Two Cities

 

 

 

 

“[T]he wisdom of our ancestors is in the simile.”
― Charles Dickens, A Christmas Carol

 

 

 

“[S]ome score of members of the High Court of Chancery bar ought to be — as here they are — mistily engaged in one of the ten thousand stages of an endless cause, tripping one another up on slippery precedents, groping knee-deep in technicalities, running their goat-hair and horse-hair warded heads against walls of words, and making a pretence of equity with serious faces ….”
― Charles Dickens, Bleak House

 

 

Charles Dickens Quotes Part 37

 

“Mrs. Rouncewell holds this opinion because she considers that a family of such antiquity and importance has a right to a ghost. She regards a ghost as one of the privileges of the upper classes, a genteel distinction to which the common people have no claim.”
― Charles Dickens, Bleak House

 

 

 

 

“How slight a thing will disturb the equanimity of our frail minds!”
― Charles Dickens, Oliver Twist

 

 

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