Charles Dickens Quotes Part 196

Charles Dickens Quotes Part 196: Charles John Huffam Dickens was an English writer and social critic. He created some of the world’s best-known fictional characters and is regarded by many as the greatest novelist of the Victorian era.

His works enjoyed unprecedented popularity during his lifetime and, by the 20th century, critics and scholars had recognised him as a literary genius. His novels and short stories are widely read today.

 

Charles Dickens Quotes Part 196

Charles dickens quotes

 

 

“A display of indifference to all the actions and passions of mankind was not supposed to be such a distinguished quality at that time, I think, as I have observed it to be considered since. I have known it very fashionable indeed. I have seen it displayed with such success, that I have encountered some fine ladies and gentlemen who might as well have been born caterpillars. Perhaps it impressed me the more then, because it was new to me, but it certainly did not tend to exalt my opinion of, or to strengthen my confidence in, Mr. Jack Maldon.”
― Charles Dickens, Works of Charles Dickens

 

 

 

 

 

“,,Jak nauczyło mnie doświadczenie, obraz, jaki zakochany tworzy sobie o przedmiocie swojej miłości, nie zawsze zgodny bywa z prawdą”
― Charles Dickens , Great Expectations

 

 

 

 

 

“It’s a devil of a thing, gentlemen,’ said Mr Swiveller, ‘when relations fall out and disagree. If the wing of friendship should never moult a feather, the wing of relationship should never be clipped, but be always expanded and serene. Why should a grandson and grandfather peg away at each other with mutual wiolence when all might be bliss and concord. Why not jine hands and forgit it?”
― Charles Dickens, The Old Curiosity Shop

 

 

Charles Dickens Quotes Part 196

 

 

“me, though he had business relations with me many years ago, and we are now intimate; I will say with the fair daughter to whom he is so devotedly attached, and who is so devotedly attached to him? Believe me, Miss Pross, I don’t approach the topic with you, out of curiosity, but out of zealous interest.” “Well! To the best of my understanding, and bad’s the best, you’ll tell me,” said Miss Pross, softened by the tone of the apology, “he is afraid of the whole subject.”
― Charles Dickens, A Tale of Two Cities

 

 

 

 

 

“Pip, dear old chap, life is made of ever so many partings welded together, as I may say, and one man’s a blacksmith, and one’s a whitesmith, and one’s a goldsmith, and one’s a coppersmith. Diwisions among such must come, and must be met as they come. If there’s been any fault at all to-day, it’s mine. You and me is not two figures to be together in London; nor yet anywheres else but what is private, and beknown, and understood among friends. It ain’t that I am proud, but that I want to be right, as you”
― Charles Dickens, Great Expectations

 

 

 

 

 

“Pumblechook made out, after carefully surveying the premises, that he had first got upon the roof of the forge, and had then got upon the roof of the house, and had then let himself down the kitchen chimney by a rope made of his bedding cut into strips; and as Mr. Pumblechook was very positive and drove his own chaise-cart — over Everybody — it was agreed that it must be so. Mr. Wopsle, indeed, wildly cried out, “No!” with the feeble malice of a tired man; but, as he had no theory, and no coat on, he was unanimously set at naught,— not to mention his smoking hard behind, as he stood with his back to the kitchen fire to draw the damp out: which was not calculated to inspire confidence.”
― Charles Dickens, Charles Dickens: The Complete Novels

 

 

Charles Dickens Quotes Part 196

 

 

 

“Whoever came about me, still settled down into Joe. I opened my eyes in the night, and I saw in the great chair at the beside, Joe. I opened my eyes in the day, and, sitting on the window-seat, smoking his pipe in the shaded open window, still I saw Joe. I asked for cooling drink, and the dear hand that gave it me was Joe’s. I sank back on my pillow after drinking, and the face that looked so hopefully and tenderly upon me was the face of Joe.
At last, one day, I took the courage, and said, ‘Is it Joe?’
And the dear old home-voice answered, ‘Which it air, old chap.’
‘Oh Joe, you break my heart! Look angry at me, Joe. Strike me, Joe. Tell me of my ingratitude. Don’t be so good to me!’
For, Joe had actually laid his head down on the pillow at my side, and put his arm round my neck, in his joy that I knew him.
‘Which, dear old Pip, old chap,’ said Joe, ‘you and me was ever friends. And when you’re well enough to go out for a ride – what larks!”
― Charles Dickens, Great Expectations

 

 

 

 

 

“In the moonlight which is always sad, as the light of the sun itself is—as the light called human life is—at its coming and its going.”
― Charles Dickens, A Tale of Two Cities

 

 

 

 

 

“it was always said of him, that he knew how to keep Christmas well, if any man alive possessed the knowledge. May that be truly said of us, and all of us! And so, as Tiny Tim observed, God bless Us, Every One!”
― Charles Dickens, A Christmas Carol

 

 

Charles Dickens Quotes Part 196

 

 

“İleride ne yapacağını hiç düşündün mü?”
“Hayır. İlerisiyle ilgili herhangi bir şey düşünmekten korkuyorum çünkü.”
― Charles Dickens, Great Expectations

 

 

 

 

 

“A day wasted on others is not wasted on oneself.”
― Charles Dickens

 

 

 

 

 

“What is the point of having all that money if you are never going to enjoy it?”
― Charles Dickens, A Christmas Carol

 

 

Charles Dickens Quotes Part 196

 

“Exactly what I myself had thought, many times. Exactly what was perfectly manifest to me at the moment. But how could I, a poor dazed village lad avoid that wonderful inconsistency into which the best and wisest of men fall everyday.”
― Charles Dickens, Great Expectations

 

 

 

 

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