Charles Dickens Quotes Part 195

Charles Dickens Quotes Part 195: Charles John Huffam Dickens was an English writer and social critic. He created some of the world’s best-known fictional characters and is regarded by many as the greatest novelist of the Victorian era.

His works enjoyed unprecedented popularity during his lifetime and, by the 20th century, critics and scholars had recognised him as a literary genius. His novels and short stories are widely read today.

 

Charles Dickens Quotes Part 195

Charles dickens quotes

 

“Martin put his hands in his pockets and whistled when he had retorted on the driver; thus giving him to understand that he didn’t care a pin for Fortune; that he was above pretending to be her favourite when he was not; and that he snapped his fingers at her, the driver, and everybody else.”
― Charles Dickens, Martin Chuzzlewit

 

 

 

 

“youth to have his hands cut off, his tongue torn out with pincers, and his body burned alive,”
― Charles Dickens, A Tale of Two Cities

 

 

 

 

“CHAPTER XLV THE TRUSTY AGENT”
― Charles Dickens, Dombey and Son

 

 

 

 

“old chap.”
― Charles Dickens, Great Expectations

 

 

 

Charles Dickens Quotes Part 195

 

“But Mr. and Mrs. Micawber were so used to their old difficulties, I think, that they felt quite shipwrecked when they came to consider that they were released from them.”
― Charles Dickens, David Copperfield

 

 

 

 

 

“The sands are the children’s great resort. They cluster there, like ants: so busy burying their particular friends, and making castles with infinite labour which the next tide overthrows, that it is curious to consider how their play, to the music of the sea, foreshadows the realities of their after lives.”
― Charles Dickens, The Complete Works of Charles Dickens

 

 

 

 

 

“Thieves and thief-takers hung in dead rapture on his words, and shrank when a hair of his eyebrows turned in their direction. Which side he was on, I couldn’t make out., for he seemed to me to be grinding the whole place on a mill; I only know that when I stole a tiptoe, he was not on the side of bench; for he was making the legs of the old gentleman who presided quite convulsive under the table , by his denunciations of his conduct as the representative of British law and justice in that chair that day.”
― Charles Dickens, Great Expectations

 

 

 

 

 

“Yet it did seem (though not to him, for he saw nothing of it) as if fantastic hope could take as strong a hold as Fact.   p.”
― Charles Dickens, Hard Times: The Original Classics – Illustrated

 

 

Charles Dickens Quotes Part 195

 

“head”
― Charles Dickens, Little Dorrit

 

 

 

 

“My loneliness since then, in all this noise and riot, has been very dreadful. May God forgive me! He has seen my solitary, lingering death.’ He folded his hands, and murmuring something more they could not hear, fell into a sleep — only a sleep at first, for they saw him smile. They whispered together for a little time, and the turnkey, stooping over the pillow, drew hastily back. ‘He has got his discharge, by G — !’ said the man. He had. But he had grown so like death in life, that they knew not when he died.”
― Charles Dickens, The Complete Works of Charles Dickens

 

 

 

 

 

 

“HE was the one for musical talents. He WAS a guard. What you may call a Guard’an Angel, was Ned.’ ‘Is he dead?’ asked Martin. ‘Dead!’ replied the other, with a contemptuous emphasis. ‘Not he. You won’t catch Ned a-dying easy. No, no. He knows better than that.’ ‘You spoke of him in the past tense,’ observed Martin, ‘so I supposed he was no more. ‘He’s no more in England,’ said Bill, ‘if that’s what you mean. He went to the U-nited States.”
― Charles Dickens, Martin Chuzzlewit

 

 

 

 

 

“if he had had any such exalted expectation, he would not have prospered. He had expected labour, and he found it, and did it and made the best of it. In this, his prosperity consisted.”
― Charles Dickens, A Tale of Two Cities

 

 

Charles Dickens Quotes Part 195

 

“us,”
― Charles Dickens, A Tale of Two Cities

 

 

 

 

 

“It is a far, far better thing that I do, than I have ever done; it is a far far better rest that I go to than I have ever known.”
― Charles Dickens

 

 

 

 

 

“…kahrımdam ölecekmişim gibi geliyordu da, ne zamandan beri kahrolduğumu, bu duyguyu haftanın hangi gününde algıladığımı, dahası bunu algılayanın ben, kendim olup olmadığını doğru dürüst kestiremiyordum bile.”
― Charles Dickens, Great Expectations

 

 

 

 

 

“Doors had lost their hinges, and were holding on by their latches; windows were broken, painted plaster had peeled off, and was lying about in clods; fowls and cats had so taken possession of the out-buildings, that I couldn’t help thinking of the fairy tales, and eyeing them with suspicion, as transformed retainers, waiting to be changed back again.  One old Tom in particular: a scraggy brute, with a hungry green eye (a poor relation, in reality, I am inclined to think): came prowling round and round me, as if he half believed, for the moment, that I might be the hero come to marry the lady, and set all to-rights; but discovering his mistake, he suddenly gave a grim snarl, and walked away with such a tremendous tail, that he couldn’t get into the little hole where he lived, but was obliged to wait outside, until his indignation and his tail had gone down together.”
― Charles Dickens, Pictures from Italy

 

 

 

 

 

“Lookee here, Pip, at what is said to you by a true friend. Whi ch this to you the true friend say. If you can’t get to be on common through going straight, you’ll never get to do it through going crooked. So don’t tell no more on ‘em, Pip, and live well and die happy.”
― Charles Dickens

 

 

 

 

“The mud lay thick upon the stones, and a black mist hung over the streets; the rain fell sluggishly down, and everything felt cold and clammy to the touch.”
― Charles Dickens, Oliver Twist

 

 

 

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