Charles Dickens Quotes Part 194

Charles Dickens Quotes Part 194: Charles John Huffam Dickens was an English writer and social critic. He created some of the world’s best-known fictional characters and is regarded by many as the greatest novelist of the Victorian era.

His works enjoyed unprecedented popularity during his lifetime and, by the 20th century, critics and scholars had recognised him as a literary genius. His novels and short stories are widely read today.

 

Charles Dickens Quotes Part 194

Charles dickens quotes

 

“At last he met the chief butler, the sight of which splendid retainer always finished him. Extinguished by this great creature, he sneaked to his dressing-room, and there remained shut up until he rode out to dinner, with Mrs Merdle, in her own handsome chariot. At dinner, he was envied”
― Charles Dickens, Little Dorrit

 

 

 

 

 

“I stood upon a chair when I was left alone, and looked into the glass to see how red my eyes were, and how sorrowful my face. I considered, after some hours were gone, if my tears were really hard to flow now, as they seemed to be, what, in connection with my loss, it would affect me most to think of when I drew near home — for I was going home to the funeral. I am sensible of having felt that a dignity attached to me among the rest of the boys, and that I was important in my affliction. If ever child were stricken with sincere grief, I was. But I remember that this importance was a kind of satisfaction to me, when I walked in the playground that afternoon while the boys were in school. When I saw them glancing at me out of the windows, as they went up to their classes, I felt distinguished, and looked more melancholy, and walked slower.”
― Charles Dickens, The Complete Works of Charles Dickens

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

“El manuscrito de un loco”
― Charles Dickens, Obras Completas ─ Colección de Charles Dickens: Obras completas – Biblioteca de Grandes Escritores

 

 

Charles Dickens Quotes Part 194

 

“I have been bent and broken, but–I hope–into better shape.”
― Charles Dickens

 

 

 

 

 

“We choose this time, because it is a time, of all others, when Want is keenly felt, and Abundance rejoices.”
― Charles Dickens

 

 

 

 

 

“tergiversation and”
― Charles Dickens, A Tale of Two Cities

 

 

Charles Dickens Quotes Part 194

 

“Old Clem! With a thump and a sound – Old Clem! Beat it out, beat it out – Old Clem! With a clink for the stout – Old Clem! Blow the fire, blow the fire – Old Clem! Roaring dryer, soaring higher – Old Clem!”
― Charles Dickens, Great Expectations

 

 

 

 

 

“The wind is rushing after us, and the clouds are flying after us, and the moon is plunging after us, and the whole wild night is in pursuit of us; but, so far, we are pursued by nothing else.”
― Charles Dickens, The Collected Works of Charles Dickens: The Complete Works

 

 

 

 

 

“Mr Henry Gowan and the dog were established frequenters of the cottage, and the day was fixed for the wedding. There was to be a convocation of Barnacles on the occasion, in order that that very high and very large family might shed as much lustre on the marriage as so dim an event was capable of receiving. To have got the whole Barnacle”
― Charles Dickens, Little Dorrit

 

 

Charles Dickens Quotes Part 194

 

 

“Technological innovations had shifted the basis of England’s economy from agriculture to industry between 1750 and 1850. The development of steam power and a boom”
― Charles Dickens, A Christmas Carol

 

 

 

 

 

“If they examined their own hearts, they would, perhaps, find at the bottom of all this, more self-love and egotism than they think of.  Self-love and egotism are bad qualities, of which the unrestrained exhibition, though it may be sometimes amusing, never fails to be wearisome and unpleasant.  Couples”
― Charles Dickens, The Complete Works of Charles Dickens

 

 

 

 

 

“You fear the world too much,” she answered gently. “All your other hopes have merged into the hope of being beyond the chance of its sordid reproach. I have seen your nobler aspirations fall off one by one, until the master passion, Gain, engrosses you. Have I not?”
― Charles Dickens, A Christmas Carol

 

 

Charles Dickens Quotes Part 194

 

 

“Contemplating the scene?’ inquired the dismal man. ‘I was,’ said Mr. Pickwick. ‘And congratulating yourself on being up so soon?’ Mr. Pickwick nodded assent. ‘Ah! people need to rise early, to see the sun in all his splendour, for his brightness seldom lasts the day through. The morning of day and the morning of life are but too much alike.”
― Charles Dickens, The Complete Works of Charles Dickens

 

 

 

 

 

“I can see her. Come close to me, Floy, and tell them,” whispered the dying boy, “that the face of the picture of Christ on the staircase at school is not divine enough; the light from it is shining on me now, and the water is shining too, and rippling so fast, so fast.” The evening light shone”
― Charles Dickens, Charles Dickens’ Children Stories

 

 

 

 

 

“All the gentlemen were very pigeon-breasted and very blue about the beards; and all the ladies were miraculous figures; and all the ladies and all the gentlemen were looking intensely nowhere, and staring with extraordinary earnestness at nothing.”
― Charles Dickens, The Complete Works of Charles Dickens

 

Charles Dickens Quotes Part 194

 

 

“Why I hoarded up this last wretched little rag of hope that was rent and given to the winds, how do I know! Why did you who read this , commit that not dissimilar inconsistency of your own, last year, last month, last week?”
― Charles Dickens, Great Expectations

 

 

 

 

“The child looked around her, with that solemn feeling with which we contemplate the work of ages that have become but drops of water in the great ocean of eternity.”
― Charles Dickens, The Old Curiosity Shop, Vol 2

 

 

 

 

“The very houses seemed disposed to pack up and take trips. Wonderful Members of Parliament, who, little more than twenty years before, had made themselves merry with the wild railroad theories of engineers, and given them the liveliest rubs in cross-examination, went down into the north with their watches in their hands, and sent on messages before by the electric telegraph, to say that they were coming.”
― Charles Dickens, Dombey and Son

 

 

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