Charles Dickens Quotes Part 191

Charles Dickens Quotes Part 191: Charles John Huffam Dickens was an English writer and social critic. He created some of the world’s best-known fictional characters and is regarded by many as the greatest novelist of the Victorian era.

His works enjoyed unprecedented popularity during his lifetime and, by the 20th century, critics and scholars had recognised him as a literary genius. His novels and short stories are widely read today.

 

Charles Dickens Quotes Part 191

Charles dickens quotes

 

“Sev onu,” dedi gene. “Sev onu, sev onu! Yüzüne gülüyorsa sev onu. Yüreğinden yaralıyorsa gene sev. Ciğerini paramparça etse bile… insan büyüyüp geliştikçe aldığı yaralar daha derinleşir çünkü… aldırma, sen gene sev onu, sev!”
― Charles Dickens, Great Expectations

 

 

 

 

 

 

“In its intention I amwell convinced that [the Eastern Penitentiary; solitary confinement] is kind, humane, and meant for reformation; but I am persuaded that those who devised this system of Prison Discipline, and those benevolent gentlemen who carry it into execution, do not know what it is that they are doing. I believe that very few men are capable of estimating the immense amount of torture and agony that this dreadful punishment, prolonged for years, inflicts upon the sufferers…”
― Charles Dickens, American Notes/The Uncommercial Traveler

 

 

 

 

 

“You are part of my existence, part of myself. You have been in every line I have ever read, since I first came here, the rough common boy whose poor heart you wounded even then.”
― Charles Dickens, Great Expectations

 

 

Charles Dickens Quotes Part 191

 

 

“If ever you’re attacked with the gout, sir, jist you marry a widder as has got a good loud woice, with a decent notion of usin’ it, and you’ll never have the gout agin. It’s a capital prescription, sir. I takes it reg’lar, and I can warrant it to drive away any illness as is caused by too much jollity.’ Having imparted this valuable secret, Mr. Weller drained his glass once more, produced a laboured wink, sighed deeply, and slowly retired.”
― Charles Dickens, The Complete Works of Charles Dickens

 

 

 

 

 

“considering”
― Charles Dickens, Three Ghost Stories

 

 

 

 

“einst ein braver Mann namens Gottfried Nickleby, der sich ziemlich spät noch in den Kopf gesetzt hatte zu heiraten. Da er aber weder jung noch begütert war und daher nicht auf die Hand einer vermögenden Dame rechnen durfte, so verehelichte”
― Charles Dickens, Nicholas Nickleby

 

 

Charles Dickens Quotes Part 191

 

“Oh, miss Haversham said I,there have been sore mistakes and my life has been a blind and thankless one, and I want forgiveness and direction far too much to be bitter with you.”
― Charles Dickens

 

 

 

 

 

“Enquanto se vestia no alojamento por cima das cavalariças em Duke Street, St. James, o estimado Twelow pensa que está numa situação pouco vantajosa comparada com a dos nobres animais na estrebaria: por um lado, não tem criado para lhe dar uma palmada retumbante que exija, numa linguagem dura, que se ponha de pé e se volte de um lado para o outro; por outro, não tem nenhum criado e todas as suas articulações estão ferrugentas de manhã. Imagina como seria agradável estar ligado pela cabeça à porta do quarto e ser habilidosamente esfregado, lavado e escovado, lustrado e vestido, enquanto desempenhava um papel passivo nestas atividades cansativas.”
― Charles Dickens, Our Mutual Friend

 

 

 

 

“The most important thing in life is to stop saying ‘I wish’ and start saying ‘I will’.”
― Charles Dickens

 

 

Charles Dickens Quotes Part 191

 

 

“It would concern the reader little, perhaps, to know how sorrowfully the pen is laid down at the close of a two-years’ imaginative task; or how an Author feels as if he were dismissing some portion of himself into the shadowy world, when a crowd of the creatures of his brain are going from him for ever.”
― Charles Dickens

 

 

 

 

 

“So I take the privilidge of the day, Mary, my dear — as the gen’l’m’n in difficulties did, ven he valked out of a Sunday — to tell you that the first and only time I see you, your likeness was took on my hart in much quicker time and brighter colours than ever a likeness was took by the profeel macheen (wich p’raps you may have heerd on Mary my dear) altho it does finish a portrait and put the frame and glass on complete, with a hook at the end to hang it up by, and all in two minutes and a quarter.”
― Charles Dickens, The Complete Works of Charles Dickens

 

 

 

 

 

“Count,’ said Mrs. Leo Hunter. ‘Mrs. Hunt,’ replied the count. ‘This is Mr. Snodgrass, a friend of Mr. Pickwick’s, and a poet.’ ‘Stop,’ exclaimed the count, bringing out the tablets once more. ‘Head, potry — chapter, literary friends — name, Snowgrass; ver good. Introduced to Snowgrass — great poet, friend of Peek Weeks — by Mrs. Hunt, which wrote other sweet poem — what is that name? — Fog — Perspiring Fog — ver good — ver good indeed.’ And the count put up his tablets, and with sundry bows and acknowledgments walked away, thoroughly satisfied that he had made the most important and valuable additions to his stock of information. ‘Wonderful man, Count Smorltork,’ said Mrs. Leo Hunter. ‘Sound philosopher,’ said Mr. Pott. ‘Clear-headed, strong-minded person,’ added Mr. Snodgrass.”
― Charles Dickens, The Complete Works of Charles Dickens

 

 

Charles Dickens Quotes Part 191

 

“You know that I am always with him to the full extent of the time allowed, and that I should be with him all day long, if I could. And when I come away from him, you know that my thoughts are with him.”
― Charles Dickens, Great Expectations

“The day arrived. A raging winter day, that shook the old house, sometimes, as if it shivered in the blast. A day to make home doubly home. To give the chimney-corner new delights. To shed a ruddier glow upon the faces gathered round the hearth, and draw each fireside group into a closer and more social league, against the roaring elements without. Such a wild winter day as best prepares the way for shut-out night; for curtained rooms, and cheerful looks; for music , laughter, dancing, light, and jovial entertainment!”
― Charles Dickens

 

 

 

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