Charles Dickens Quotes Part 190

Charles Dickens Quotes Part 190: Charles John Huffam Dickens was an English writer and social critic. He created some of the world’s best-known fictional characters and is regarded by many as the greatest novelist of the Victorian era.

His works enjoyed unprecedented popularity during his lifetime and, by the 20th century, critics and scholars had recognised him as a literary genius. His novels and short stories are widely read today.

 

Charles Dickens Quotes Part 190

Charles dickens quotes

 

 

“The state of that wretch who continually finds the weak spots in his own crime, and strives to strengthen them when it is unchangeable, is a state that aggravates the offence by doing the deed a thousand times instead of once; but it is a state, too, that tauntingly visits the offence upon a sullen unrepentant nature with its heaviest punishment every time.”
― Charles Dickens, Our Mutual Friend

 

 

 

 

“Dear Magwitch, I must tell you, now, at last. You understand what I say?’
A gentle pressure on my hand.
‘You had a child once, whom you loved and lost.’
A stronger pressure on my hand.
‘She lived and found powerful friends. She is living now. She is a lady and very beautiful. And I love her!’
With a last faint effort, which would have been powerless but for my yielding to it, as assisting it, he raised my hand to his lips. Then he gently let it sink upon his breast again, with his own hands lying on it. The placid look at the white ceiling came back, and passed away, and his head dropped quietly on his breast.”
― Charles Dickens, Great Expectations

 

 

 

 

 

“Richard and I looked at one another again. It was a most singular thing that the arrest was our embarrassment and not Mr. Skimpole’s. He observed us with a genial interest, but there seemed, if I may venture on such a contradiction, nothing selfish in it. He had entirely washed his hands of the difficulty, and it had become ours.”
― Charles Dickens, Bleak House

 

 

 

 

 

“there is a natural propriety in the companionship: always to be noted in confidence between a child and a person who has any merit of reality and genuineness: which is admirably pleasant.”
― Charles Dickens, The Complete Works of Charles Dickens

 

 

Charles Dickens Quotes Part 190

 

“stolid”
― Charles Dickens, A Tale of Two Cities

 

 

 

 

“And if it’s proud to have a heart that never hardens, and a temper that never tires, and a touch that never hurts,’ Miss Jenny struck in, flushed, ‘she is proud. And if it’s not, she is NOT.”
― Charles Dickens, Our Mutual Friend

 

 

 

 

“As he bowed to me in that tight state, I almost believed I saw creases come into the whites of his eyes.”
― Charles Dickens, Bleak House

 

 

 

 

“All of which is here recorded to the honour of that good Christian pair, representatives of hundreds of other good Christian pairs as conscientious and as useful, who merge the smallness of their work in its greatness, and feel in no danger of losing dignity when they adapt themselves to incomprehensible humbugs.”
― Charles Dickens, Our Mutual Friend

 

Charles Dickens Quotes Part 190

 

 

“full well knowing that, whatever little motes my beamy eyes may have descried in theirs, they belong to a kind, generous, large-hearted, and great people.”
― Charles Dickens, The Complete Works of Charles Dickens

 

 

 

 

 

“Mindful, then, of what we had read together, I thought of the two men who went up into the Temple to pray, and I knew there were no better words that I could say beside his bed, than ‘O Lord, be merciful to him, a sinner!”
― Charles Dickens, Great Expectations

 

 

 

 

 

“we all did what we undertake to do, as faithfully as Herbert did, we might live in a Republic of the Virtues.”
― Charles Dickens, Great Expectations

 

 

 

 

“As Oliver accompanied his master in most of his adult expeditions too, in order that he might acquire that equanimity of demeanour and full command of nerve which was essential to a finished undertaker, he had many opportunities of observing the beautiful resig nation and fortitude with which some strong-minded people bear their trials and losses.”
― Charles Dickens

 

 

Charles Dickens Quotes Part 190

 

 

“Waste forces within him, and a desert all around, this man stood still on his way across a silent terrace, and saw for a moment, lying in the wilderness before him, a mirage of honourable ambition, self-denial, and perseverance. In the fair city of this vision, there were airy galleries from which the loves and graces looked upon him, gardens in which the fruits of life hung ripening, waters of Hope that sparkled in his sight. A moment, and it was gone. Clim bing to a high chamber in a well of houses, he threw himself down in his clothes on a neglec ted bed, and its pillow was wet with wasted tears. Sadly, sadly, the sun rose; it rose upon no sadder sight than the man of good abilities and good emotions, incapable of their directed exercise, incapable of his own help and his own happiness, sensible of the blight on him, and resigning himself to let it eat him away. Chapter 6 — Hundreds of People The quiet lodgings of Doctor Manette were in a quiet street-corner not far from Soho-square. On the afternoon of a certain fine Sunday when the waves of four months had roiled over the trial for treason, and carried”
― Charles Dickens, Charles Dickens: The Complete Novels

 

 

 

 

 

“Whether an exceedingly small expansion of eye be sufficient to quell paupers, who, being lightly fed, are in no very high condition; or whether the late Mrs Corney was particularly proff against eagle glances; are matters of opinion. The matter of fact is, that the matron was in no way overpowered by Mr Bumble’s scowl, but, on the contrary, treated it with great disdain, and even raised a laugh thereat, which sounded as though it were genuine.”
― Charles Dickens, Oliver Twist

 

 

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