Charles Dickens Quotes Part 183

Charles Dickens Quotes Part 183: Charles John Huffam Dickens was an English writer and social critic. He created some of the world’s best-known fictional characters and is regarded by many as the greatest novelist of the Victorian era.

His works enjoyed unprecedented popularity during his lifetime and, by the 20th century, critics and scholars had recognised him as a literary genius. His novels and short stories are widely read today.

 

Charles Dickens Quotes Part 183

Charles dickens quotes

 

“E, assim como as neblinas da manhã haviam se dissipado, quando, há muito tempo, eu deixara a ferraria, as neblinas da noite dissipavam-se agora, e em toda a vasta expansão iluminada que me deixavam avistar, não vi a sombra de uma nova despedida de Estella.”
― Charles Dickens, Great Expectations

 

 

 

 

 

 

“The sort of interest with which this man was stared and breathed at, was not a sort that elevated humanity. Had he stood in peril of a less horrible sentence–had there been a chance of any one of its savage details being spared–by just so much would he have lost in his fascination. The form that was to be doomed to be so shamefully mangled, was the sight; the immortal creature that was to be so butchered and torn asunder, yielded the sensation. Whatever gloss the various spectators put upon the interest, according to their several arts and powers of self-deceit, the interest was, at the root of it, Ogreish.”
― Charles Dickens, A Tale of Two Cities

 

 

 

 

 

 

“It was the best of times,
it was the worst of times,
it was the age of wisdom,
it was the age of foolishness,
it was the epoch of belief,
it was the epoch of incredulity,
it was the season of Light,
it was the season of Darkness,
it was the spring of hope,
it was the winter of despair, we had everything before us, we had nothing before us, we were all going direct to Heaven, we were all going direct the other way— in short, the period was so far like the present period, that some of its noisiest authorities insisted on its being received, for good or for evil, in the superlative degree of comparison only.”
― Charles Dickens, A Tale of Two Cities

 

 

 

 

 

 

“had passed from its surface and this earth’s together. Haunted in a most ghastly manner that abominable place would have been, if the glass could ever have rendered back its reflections, as the ocean is one day to give up its dead. Some passing thought of the infamy and disgrace for which it had been reserved, may have struck the prisoner’s mind. Be that as it may, a change in his position”
― Charles Dickens, A Tale of Two Cities

 

 

Charles Dickens Quotes Part 183

 

 

 

“there were more children there than Scrooge in his agitated mind could count, and unlike the celebrated poem, not every forty children were acting as one, but every child was acting as forty.”
― Charles Dickens

 

 

 

 

 

 

“The most important thing in life is to stop saying ‘I wish’ and start saying ‘I will”
― Charles Dickens

 

 

 

 

 

“I have such unmanageable thoughts,’ returned his sister, ‘that they will wonder.’   ‘Then”
― Charles Dickens, Hard Times: The Original Classics – Illustrated

 

 

 

 

 

“Once out of this court, I’ll smash that face of yourn!”
― Charles Dickens, Great Expectations

 

 

Charles Dickens Quotes Part 183

 

 

“A wonderful fact to reflect upon, that every human creature is constituted to be that profound secret and mystery to every other… Something of the awfulness, even of Death itself, is referable to this. No more can I turn the leaves of this dear book that I loved, and vainly hope in time to read it all. No more can I look into the depths of this unfathomable water, wherein, as momentary lights glanced into it, I have had glimpses of buried treasure and other things submerged. It was appointed that the book should shut with a spring, for ever and for ever, when I had read but a page. It was appointed that the water should be locked in an eternal frost, when the light was playing on its surface, and I stood in ignorance on the shore.”
― Charles Dickens, A Tale of Two Cities

 

 

 

 

 

“For’ (he observed), ‘if every one were warm and well-fed, we should lose the satisfaction of admiring the fortitude with which certain conditions of men bear cold and hunger.”
― Charles Dickens, Martin Chuzzlewit

 

 

 

 

 

“Say a good fellow, if you want a phrase,’ returned Herbert, smiling, and clapping his hand on the back of mine: ‘a good fellow, with impetuosity and hesitation, boldness and diffidence, action and dreaming curiously mixed in him.”
― Charles Dickens, Great Expectations

 

 

 

 

 

“growlery.”
― Charles Dickens, Bleak House

 

 

Charles Dickens Quotes Part 183

 

 

“It is not possible to know how far the influence of any amiable, honest-hearted duty-doing man flies out into the world, but it is very possible to know how it has touched one’s self in going by, and I know right well that any good that intermixed itself with my apprenticeship came of plain contented Joe, and not of restlessly aspiring discontented me.”
― Charles Dickens, Great Expectations

 

 

 

 

 

“cada uno de los seres humanos es un profundo secreto para los demás.”
― Charles Dickens, Historia de dos ciudades

 

 

 

 

 

 

“Whenever Mr. Snagsby and his conductors are stationary, the crowd flows round, and from its squalid depths obsequious advice heaves up to Mr. Bucket. Whenever they move, and the angry bull’s-eyes glare, it fades away and flits about them up the alleys, and in the ruins, and behind the walls, as before.”
― Charles Dickens, Bleak House

 

 

 

 

 

 

“I was too cowardly to do what I knew to be right, as I had been too cowardly to avoid doing what I knew to be wrong. I”
― Charles Dickens, Great Expectations

 

 

Charles Dickens Quotes Part 183

 

 

“I cannot rest, I cannot stay, I cannot linger anywhere.”
― Charles Dickens, A Christmas Carol

 

 

 

“And now, as I close my task, subduing my desire to linger yet, these faces fade away. But one face, shining on me like a Heavenly light by which I see all other objects, is above them and beyond them all. And that remains.
I turn my head, and see it, in its beautiful serenity, beside me.
My lamp burns low, and I have written far into the night; but the dear presence, without which I were nothing, bears me company.”
― Charles Dickens, David Copperfield

 

 

 

 

 

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