Charles Dickens Quotes Part 180

Charles Dickens Quotes Part 180: Charles John Huffam Dickens was an English writer and social critic. He created some of the world’s best-known fictional characters and is regarded by many as the greatest novelist of the Victorian era.

His works enjoyed unprecedented popularity during his lifetime and, by the 20th century, critics and scholars had recognised him as a literary genius. His novels and short stories are widely read today.

 

Charles Dickens Quotes Part 180

Charles dickens quotes

 

 

“But soon the steeples called good people all, to church and chapel, and away they came, flocking through the streets in their best clothes, and with their gayest faces. And at the same time there emerged from scores of bye-streets, lanes, and nameless turnings, innumerable people, carrying their dinners to the bakers’ shops. The sight of these poor revellers appeared to interest the Spirit very much, for he stood with Scrooge beside him in a baker’s doorway, and taking off the covers as their bearers passed, sprinkled incense on their dinners from his torch. And it was a very uncommon kind of torch, for once or twice when there were angry words between some dinner-carriers who had jostled with each other, he shed a few drops of water on them from it, and their good humour was restored directly. For they said, it was a shame to quarrel upon Christmas Day. And so it was! God love it, so it was! In time the bells ceased, and the bakers’ were shut up; and yet there was a genial shadowing forth of all these dinners and the progress of their cooking, in the thawed blotch of wet above each baker’s oven; where the pavement smoked as if its stones were cooking too. “Is there a peculiar flavour in what you sprinkle from your torch?” asked Scrooge. “There is. My own.” “Would it apply to any kind of dinner on this day?” asked Scrooge. “To any kindly given. To a poor one most.” “Why to a poor one most?” asked Scrooge. “Because it needs it most.” “Spirit,” said Scrooge, after a moments thought, “I wonder you, of all the beings in the many worlds about us, should desire to cramp these peoples opportunities of innocent enjoyment.” “I!” cried the Spirit. “You would deprive them of their means of dining every seventh day, often the only day on which they can be said to dine at all,” said Scrooge. “Wouldn’t you?” “I!” cried the Spirit. “You seek to close these places on the Seventh Day?” said Scrooge. “And it comes to the same thing.” “I seek!” exclaimed the Spirit. “Forgive me if I am wrong. It has been done in your name, or at least in that of your family,” said Scrooge. “There are some upon this earth of yours,” returned the Spirit, “who lay claim to know us, and who do their deeds of passion, pride, ill-will, hatred, envy, bigotry* and selfishness in our name; who are as strange to us and all our kith and kin, as if they had never lived. Remember that, and charge their doings on themselves, not us.”
― Charles Dickens, A Christmas Carol

 

 

 

Charles Dickens Quotes Part 180

 

 

“She never missed before,” says a knitting-woman of the sisterhood. “No; nor will she miss now,” cries The Vengeance, petulantly. “Therese.” “Louder,” the woman recommends.”
― Charles Dickens, A Tale of Two Cities

 

 

 

 

 

“Like man in the abstract, he is here to-day and gone to-morrow—but, very unlike man indeed, he is here again the next day.”
― Charles Dickens, Bleak House

 

 

 

 

 

“I really feel almost ashamed of having known that he was not quite in his wits, taking account of the utmost I have done with mine.”
― Charles Dickens, David Copperfield

 

 

Charles Dickens Quotes Part 180

 

 

“earthly order of events had lately come to the English Crown and People, from a congress of British subjects in America: which, strange to relate, have proved more important”
― Charles Dickens, A Tale of Two Cities

 

 

 

 

 

“she hated and detested Nicholas with all the narrowness of mind and littleness of purpose worthy a descendant of the house of Squeers.”
― Charles Dickens, Nicholas Nickleby

 

 

 

 

 

 

“within the harbour, or on the beautiful sea without. The line of demarcation between the two colours, black and blue, showed the point which the pure sea would not pass; but it lay as quiet as the abominable pool, with which it never mixed. Boats without awnings were too hot to touch; ships blistered at their moorings; the stones of the quays had not cooled, night or day, for months. Hindoos, Russians, Chinese, Spaniards, Portuguese, Englishmen, Frenchmen, Genoese, Neapolitans, Venetians, Greeks, Turks, descendants from all the builders of Babel, come to trade at Marseilles, sought the shade alike—taking refuge in any hiding-place from a sea too intensely blue to be looked at, and a sky of purple, set with one great flaming jewel of fire. The universal stare made the eyes ache. Towards the distant line of Italian coast, indeed, it was a little relieved”
― Charles Dickens, Little Dorrit

 

 

 

Charles Dickens Quotes Part 180

 

 

 

“of him; spectators in back rows stood up, not to miss a hair of him; people on the floor of the court, laid their hands on the shoulders of the people before them, to help themselves, at anybody’s cost, to a view of him—”
― Charles Dickens, A Tale of Two Cities

 

 

 

 

 

 

“I have loved you all my life!”
― Charles Dickens, David Copperfield

 

 

 

 

 

 

“mind will express itself through any covering of the body, so the paleness which his situation engendered came through the brown upon his cheek, showing the soul to be stronger than the sun. He was otherwise quite self-possessed, bowed to the Judge, and stood”
― Charles Dickens, A Tale of Two Cities

 

 

Charles Dickens Quotes Part 180

 

 

 

“Little Dorrit that she had not seen Mr F.’s Aunt so full of life and character for weeks; that she would find it necessary to”
― Charles Dickens, Little Dorrit

 

 

 

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