Charles Dickens Quotes Part 178

Charles Dickens Quotes Part 178: Charles John Huffam Dickens was an English writer and social critic. He created some of the world’s best-known fictional characters and is regarded by many as the greatest novelist of the Victorian era.

His works enjoyed unprecedented popularity during his lifetime and, by the 20th century, critics and scholars had recognised him as a literary genius. His novels and short stories are widely read today.

 

Charles Dickens Quotes Part 178

Charles dickens quotes

 

“We stopped to dine at Baltimore, and being now in Maryland, were waited on, for the first time, by slaves. The sensation of exacting any service from human creatures who are bought and sold, and being, for the time, a party as it were to their condition, is not an enviable one. The institution exists, perhaps, in its least repulsive and most mitigated form in such a town as this; but it is slavery; and though I was, with respect to it, an innocent man, its presence filled me with a sense of shame and self-reproach.”
― Charles Dickens, American Notes and Pictures from Italy

 

 

 

 

 

 

“It is the most miserable thing to feel ashamed at home.”
― Charles Dickens, Great Expectations

 

 

 

 

 

 

“But what,’ said Mr Swiveller with a sigh, ‘what is the odds so long as the fire of soul is kindled at the taper of conwiviality, and the wing of friendship never moults a feather! What is the odds so long as the spirit is expanded by means of rosy wine, and the present moment is the least happiest of our existence!”
― Charles Dickens, The Old Curiosity Shop

 

 

Charles Dickens Quotes Part 178

 

 

 

“Sow the same seed of rapacious license and oppression over again, and it will surely yield the same fruit according to its kind.”
― Charles Dickens, A Tale of Two Cities

 

 

 

 

 

 

“I felt like one who was toiling home barefoot from distant travel, and whose wanderings had lasted many years.”
― Charles Dickens, Great Expectations

 

 

 

 

 

 

“judges and honoured men, bringing a boy of my name, with a forehead that I know and golden hair, to this place—then fair to look upon, with not a trace of this day’s disfigurement—”
― Charles Dickens, A Tale of Two Cities

 

 

 

 

 

“For Evil often stops short at itself and dies with the doer of it; but Good, never.”
― Charles Dickens

 

 

Charles Dickens Quotes Part 178

 

 

“Pensei em como as coisas que nunca acontecem, são muitas vezes realidades para nós, nos seus efeitos, como aquelas que são concretizadas.”
― Charles Dickens, David Copperfield

 

 

 

 

 

 

“Because, if it is to spite her,” Biddy pursued, “I should think—but you know best—that might be better and more independently done by caring nothing for her words. And if it is to gain her over, I should think—but you know best—she was not worth gaining over.”
― Charles Dickens, Great Expectations

 

 

 

 

 

“…lies is lies. Howsever they come, they didn’t ought to come, and they come from the father of lies, work round to the same.”
― Charles Dickens, Great Expectations

 

 

 

 

 

“…kararsızlıklar içinde bocalayarak ne anlatılmaz işkenceler çektim, Ulu Tanrım! Aylarca her akşam kendi sorularımı, “Hayır,” diye yanıtladım; gene de ertesi sabah kendi kendime aynı konuyu tazeleyip aynı soruları sormaktan kendimi alamadım.”
― Charles Dickens, Great Expectations

 

 

Charles Dickens Quotes Part 178

 

 

“One always begins to forgive a place as soon as it’s left behind;”
― Charles Dickens, Little Dorrit

 

 

 

 

 

“People must be amuthed.” – Mr. Sleary”
― Charles Dickens, Hard Times

 

 

 

 

 

“Dear Sir,
I beg to acknowledge the receipt of your obliging letter, and to assure you that my time and attention are far too much occupied, to admit of my having the pleasure you propose to me.

Faithfully Yours

Charles Dickens

The Letters of Charles Dickens
The Pilgrim Edition
Volume 9: 1859-1861”
― Charles Dickens

 

 

 

Charles Dickens Quotes Part 178

 

 

“quietly down into the roaring streets, inseparable and blessed; and as they passed along in sunshine and shade, the noisy and the eager, and the arrogant and the froward and the vain, fretted and chafed, and made their usual uproar.”
― Charles Dickens, Little Dorrit

 

 

 

 

 

“It was fine in the morning, particularly in the fine mornings.”
― Charles Dickens, David Copperfield

 

 

 

 

 

“crystal to the lords of the State preserves of loaves and fishes, that things in general were settled for ever. It was the year of Our Lord one thousand seven hundred and seventy-five. Spiritual revelations were conceded to”
― Charles Dickens, A Tale of Two Cities

 

 

 

 

 

 

“was the best of times, it was the worst of times, it was the age of wisdom, it was the age of foolishness, it was the epoch of belief, it was the epoch of incredulity, it was the season of Light, it was the season of Darkness, it was the spring of hope, it was the winter of despair,”
― Charles Dickens, A Tale of Two Cities

 

 

 

Charles Dickens Quotes Part 178

 

 

“It was the best of times, it was the worst of times, it was the age of wisdom, it was the age of foolishness, it was the epoch of belief, it was the epoch of incredulity, it was the season of Light, it was the season of Darkness, it was the spring of hope, it was the winter of despair, we had everything before us, we had nothing before us, we were all going direct to Heaven, we were all going direct the other way.”
― Charles Dickens, A Tale of Two Cities

 

 

 

 

 

 

“keeping all things in their places. Everybody was dressed for a Fancy Ball that was never to leave off. From the Palace of the Tuileries, through Monseigneur and the whole Court, through the Chambers, the Tribunals of Justice, and all society (except the scarecrows),”
― Charles Dickens, A Tale of Two Cities

 

 

 

 

 

 

“Apprehension of a painful or disagreeable recognition made me tremble. I am confident that it took no distinctness of shape, and that it was the revival for a few minutes of the terror of childhood.”
― Charles Dickens, Great Expectations

 

 

 

 

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