Charles Dickens Quotes Part 170

Charles Dickens Quotes Part 170: Charles John Huffam Dickens was an English writer and social critic. He created some of the world’s best-known fictional characters and is regarded by many as the greatest novelist of the Victorian era.

His works enjoyed unprecedented popularity during his lifetime and, by the 20th century, critics and scholars had recognised him as a literary genius. His novels and short stories are widely read today.

 

Charles Dickens Quotes Part 170

Charles dickens quotes

 

“Christmas was close at hand, in all his bluff and hearty honesty; it was the season of hospitality, merriment, and open-heartedness; the old year was preparing, like an ancient philosopher, to call his friends around him, and amidst the sound of feasting and revelry to pass gently and calmly away. Gay and merry was the time; and right gay and merry were at least four of the numerous hearts that were gladdened by its coming.”
― Charles Dickens, The Pickwick Papers

 

 

 

 

 

“Marley was dead, to begin with. There is no doubt whatever about that.”
― Charles Dickens, A Christmas Carol

 

 

 

 

 

“Why look’e, young gentleman,” said Toby, “when a man keeps himself so very ex-clusive as I have done, and by that means has a snug house over his head with nobody a-prying and smelling about it, it’s rather a starling thing to have the honour of a wisit from a young gentleman (however respectable and pleasant a person he may be to play cards with at conweniency) circumstanced as you are.”
― Charles Dickens, Oliver Twist

 

 

 

 

 

“ever. It was the year of Our Lord one thousand seven hundred and seventy-five. Spiritual revelations were conceded to England at that favoured period, as at this. Mrs. Southcott had recently attained her five-and-twentieth blessed”
― Charles Dickens, A Tale of Two Cities

 

 

Charles Dickens Quotes Part 170

 

 

“Good gracious, Arthur,—I should say Mr Clennam, far more proper—the climb we have had to get up here and how ever to get down”
― Charles Dickens, Little Dorrit

 

 

 

 

 

“I may here remark that I suppose myself to be better acquainted than any living authority, with the ridgy effect of a wedding-ring, passing unsympathetically over the human countenance.”
― Charles Dickens, Great Expectations

 

 

 

 

 

“sickness, ignorance, and want, were the lords in waiting on the saintly presence—nobles of great power all of them; but, most especially the last. Samples of a people that had undergone a terrible grinding and regrinding in the mill, and certainly not in the fabulous mill which ground old people young, shivered at every corner, passed in and out at every doorway, looked from every window, fluttered in every vestige of a garment that the wind shook. The mill which had worked them down, was the mill that grinds”
― Charles Dickens, A Tale of Two Cities

 

 

 

 

 

“But it is not in the nature of pure love to burn so fiercely and unkindly long. The flame that in its grosser composition has the taint of earth, may prey upon the breast that gives it shelter; but the sacred fire from Heaven, is as gentle in the heart, as when it rested on the heads of the assembled twelve,* and showed each man his brother, brightened and unhurt. The”
― Charles Dickens, Dombey and Son

 

 

Charles Dickens Quotes Part 170

 

 

 

“fellow,’ said the Father of the Marshalsea, laying his hand upon his shoulder, and mildly rallying him—mildly, because of his weakness, poor dear soul;”
― Charles Dickens, Little Dorrit

 

 

 

 

 

“A thing constructed can only be loved after it is constructed; but a thing created is loved before it exists.”
― Charles Dickens

 

 

 

 

 

“The girl had taken a few restless turns to and fro—closely watched meanwhile by her hidden observer—when the heavy bell of St. Paul’s tolled for the death of another day. Midnight had come upon the crowded city. The palace, the night-cellar,* the jail, the madhouse: the chambers of birth and death, of health and sickness, the rigid face of the corpse and the calm sleep of the child: midnight was upon them all.”
― Charles Dickens, Oliver Twist

 

 

 

 

 

 

“had considered it a little while, she said to the tiny woman, And you keep watch over this every day? And she cast down her eyes,”
― Charles Dickens, Little Dorrit

 

 

Charles Dickens Quotes Part 170

 

 

“Marshalsea and all its blighted fruits. They went quietly down into the roaring streets, inseparable and blessed; and as they passed along in sunshine and shade, the noisy and the eager, and the arrogant and the froward and the vain, fretted”
― Charles Dickens, Little Dorrit

 

 

 

 

 

 

“Through the same cold sunlight, colder as the day declines, and through the same sharp wind, sharper as the separate shadows of bare trees gloom together in the woods, and as the Ghost’s Walk, touched at the western corner by a pile of fire in the sky, resigns itself to coming night, they drive into the park.”
― Charles Dickens, Bleak House

 

 

 

 

 

 

“Wherefore the clerk put on his white comforter, and tried to warm himself at the candle; in which effort, not being a man of a strong imagination, he failed.”
― Charles Dickens, A Christmas Carol

 

 

 

 

 

“He looked about him in a confused way, as if he had lost his place in the book of his remembrance; and he turned his face to the fire, and spread his hands broader on his knees, and lifted them off and put them on again.”
― Charles Dickens, Great Expectations

 

 

 

Charles Dickens Quotes Part 170

 

“wonderful fact to reflect upon, that every human creature is constituted to be that profound secret and mystery to every other. A solemn consideration,”
― Charles Dickens, A Tale of Two Cities

 

 

 

 

 

 

“The cold within him froze his old features, nipped his pointed nose, shrivelled his cheek, stiffened his gait; made his eyes red, his thin lips blue; and spoke out shrewdly in his grating voice. A frosty rime was on his head, and on his eyebrows, and his wiry chin. He carried his own low temperature always about with him; he iced his office in the dog-days; and didn’t thaw it one degree at Christmas.”
― Charles Dickens, A Christmas Carol

 

 

 

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