Charles Dickens Quotes Part 169

Charles Dickens Quotes Part 169: Charles John Huffam Dickens was an English writer and social critic. He created some of the world’s best-known fictional characters and is regarded by many as the greatest novelist of the Victorian era.

His works enjoyed unprecedented popularity during his lifetime and, by the 20th century, critics and scholars had recognised him as a literary genius. His novels and short stories are widely read today.

 

Charles Dickens Quotes Part 169

Charles dickens quotes

 

“A bottle of good claret after dinner does a digger in the red coals no harm, otherwise than as it has a tendency to throw him out of work. Mr. Lorry had been idle a long time, and had just poured out his last glassful of wine with as complete an appearance of satisfaction as is ever to be found in an elderly gentleman of a fresh complexion who has got to the end of a bottle, when a rattling of wheels came up the narrow street, and rumbled into the inn-yard.”
― Charles Dickens, A Tale of Two Cities

 

 

 

 

 

“Yet he would smoke his pipe at the Battery with a far more sagacious air then anywhere else – even with a learned air – as if he considered himself to be advancing immensely. Dear fellow, I hope he did.”
― Charles Dickens, Great Expectations

 

 

 

 

 

“Once for all; I knew to my sorrow, often and often, if not always, that I loved her against reason, against promise, against peace, against hope, against happiness, against all discouragement that could be. Once for all; I loved her none the less because I knew it, and it had no more influence in restraining me than if I had devoutly believed her to be human perfection.”
― Charles Dickens, Great Expectations

 

 

 

 

 

“authorities within, the shadows of the night took such shapes to him as arose out of the message, and took such shapes to the mare as arose out of her private topics of uneasiness. They seemed to be numerous, for she shied at every shadow on the road. What time, the mail-coach lumbered, jolted, rattled,”
― Charles Dickens, A Tale of Two Cities

 

 

Charles Dickens Quotes Part 169

 

 

“Eles [os livros] mantiveram viva minha fantasia e minha esperança em alguma coisa além daquele tempo e lugar [do sofrimento, da tristeza].”
― Charles Dickens, David Copperfield

 

 

 

 

 

“order of events had lately come to the English Crown and People, from a congress of British subjects in America: which, strange to relate, have proved more important to the human race than any communications yet received through any of the chickens of the Cock-lane brood.”
― Charles Dickens, A Tale of Two Cities

 

 

 

 

 

“had lately come to the English Crown and People, from a congress of British subjects in America: which, strange to relate, have proved more important to the human race than any communications”
― Charles Dickens, A Tale of Two Cities

 

 

 

 

 

“conscience is an elastic and very flexible article, which will bear a deal of stretching and adapt itself to a great variety of circumstances. Some people by prudent management and leaving it off piece by piece like a flannel waistcoat in warm weather, even contrive, in time, to dispense with it altogether; but there be others who can assume the garment and throw it off at pleasure; and this, being the greatest and most convenient improvement, is the one most in vogue.”
― Charles Dickens, The Old Curiosity Shop

 

 

Charles Dickens Quotes Part 169

 

 

 

“It was the best of times, it was the worst of times, it was the age of wisdom, it was the age of foolishness, it was the epoch of belief, it was the epoch of incredulity, it was the season of Light, it was the season of Darkness, it was the spring of hope, it was the winter of despair, we had everything before us, we had nothing before us, we were all going direct to Heaven, we were all going direct the other way—”
― Charles Dickens, A Tale of Two Cities

 

 

 

 

 

 

“He occupied rooms in the Bank, in his fidelity to the House of which he had grown to be a part, lie strong root-ivy. it chanced that they derived a kind of security from the patriotic occupation of the main building, but the true-hearted old gentleman never calculated about that. All such circumstances were indifferent to him, so that he did his duty. On”
― Charles Dickens, A Tale of Two Cities

 

 

 

 

 

“The leprosy of unreality disfigured every human creature in attendance”
― Charles Dickens, A Tale of Two Cities

 

 

 

 

 

“Christmas”
― Charles Dickens, A Christmas Carol

 

 

Charles Dickens Quotes Part 169

 

 

“I wear the chain I forged in life,”
― Charles Dickens, Charles Dickens: Collection of 150 Classic Works with analysis and historical background

 

 

 

 

 

“At one of these a lonely boy was reading near a feeble fire; and Scrooge sat down upon a form, and wept to see his poor forgotten self as he used to be.”
― Charles Dickens, A Christmas Carol

 

 

 

 

 

 

“a plain face, on the throne of England; there were a king with a large jaw and a queen with a fair face, on the throne of France. In both countries it was clearer than crystal to the lords of the State preserves”
― Charles Dickens, A Tale of Two Cities

 

 

 

 

 

“As good as gold,” said Bob, “and better. Somehow he gets thoughtful, sitting by himself so much, and thinks the strangest things you ever heard. He told me, coming home, that he hoped the people saw him in the church, because he was a cripple, and it might be pleasant to them to remember upon Christmas Day, who made lame beggars walk, and blind men see.”
― Charles Dickens, A Christmas Carol

 

 

 

Charles Dickens Quotes Part 169

 

 

“He was a great politician of course, and explained his opinions at some length to one of our company; but I only remember that he concluded with two sentiments, one of which was, Somebody for ever; and the other, Blast everybody else! which is by no means a bad abstract of the general creed in these matters.”
― Charles Dickens, American Notes for General Circulation

 

 

 

 

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