Charles Dickens Quotes Part 167

Charles Dickens Quotes Part 167: Charles John Huffam Dickens was an English writer and social critic. He created some of the world’s best-known fictional characters and is regarded by many as the greatest novelist of the Victorian era.

His works enjoyed unprecedented popularity during his lifetime and, by the 20th century, critics and scholars had recognised him as a literary genius. His novels and short stories are widely read today.

 

Charles Dickens Quotes Part 167

Charles dickens quotes

 

“Who is Slumkey?’whispered Mr. Tupman. ‘I don’t know,’ replied Mr. Pickwick, in the same tone. ‘Hush. Don’t ask any questions. It’s always best on these occasions to do what the mob do.’ ‘But suppose there are two mobs?’ suggested Mr. Snodgrass. ‘Shout with the largest,’ replied Mr. Pickwick. Volumes could not have said more.”
― Charles Dickens, The Complete Works of Charles Dickens

 

 

 

 

 

“Mr. Pumblechook made out, after carefully surveying the premises, that he had first got upon the roof of the forge, and had then got upon the roof of the house, and had then let himself down the kitchen chimney by a rope made of his bedding cut into strips; and as Mr. Pumblechook was very positive and drove his own chaise-cart—over Everybody—it was agreed that it must be so.”
― Charles Dickens, Great Expectations

 

 

 

 

 

“It was no great gift, for there was mighty little wine left; but Signor Cavalletto, jumping to his feet, received the bottle gratefully, turned it upside down at his mouth, and smacked his lips.”
― Charles Dickens, Little Dorrit

 

 

 

Charles Dickens Quotes Part 167

 

 

“Therefore Flora said, though still not without a certain boastfulness and triumph in her legacy, that Mr F.’s Aunt was ‘very lively to-day, and she thought they had better go.’ But Mr F.’s Aunt proved so lively as to take the suggestion in unexpected dudgeon and declare that she would not go; adding, with several injurious expressions, that if ‘He’–too evidently meaning Clennam–wanted to get rid of her, ‘let him chuck her out of winder;’ and urgently expressing her desire to see ‘Him’ perform that ceremony.

In this dilemma, Mr Pancks, whose resources appeared equal to any emergency in the Patriarchal waters, slipped on his hat, slipped out at the counting-house door, and slipped in again a moment afterwards with an artificial freshness upon him, as if he had been in the country for some weeks. ‘Why, bless my heart, ma’am!’ said Mr Pancks, rubbing up his hair in great astonishment, ‘is that you?

How do you do, ma’am? You are looking charming to-day! I am delighted to see you. Favour me with your arm, ma’am; we’ll have a little walk together, you and me, if you’ll honour me with your company.’ And so escorted Mr F.’s Aunt down the private staircase of the counting-house with great gallantry and success.

— Little Dorrit, Charles Dickens”
― Charles Dickens, Little Dorrit: Volume 1

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

“It was the best of times, it was the worst of times, it was the age of wisdom, it was the age of foolishness, it was the epoch of belief, it was the epoch of incredulity, it was the season of Light, it was the season of Darkness, it was the spring of hope, it was the winter of despair, we had everything before us, we had nothing before us, we were all going direct to Heaven, we were all going direct the other way— in short, the period was so far like the present period,”
― Charles Dickens, A Tale of Two Cities

 

 

 

 

 

 

“But I am sure I have always thought of Christmas time, when it has come round–apart from the veneration due to its sacred name and origin, if anything belonging to it can be apart from that–as a good time; a kind, forgiving, charitable, pleasant time; the only time I know of, in the long calendar of the year, when men and women seem by one consent to open their shut-up hearts freely, and to think of people below them as if they really were fellow-passengers to the grave, and not another race of creatures bound on other journeys.”
― Charles Dickens, A Christmas Carol

 

 

 

Charles Dickens Quotes Part 167

 

 

 

“Es gibt Menschen auf eurer Erde”, entgegnete der Geist, “die uns kennen wollen und die ihre Taten des Stolzes, der Missgunst, des Hasses, des Neides, des Fanatismus und der Selbstsucht in unserm Namen tun; die uns in allem, was zu uns gehört, so fremd sind, so als hätten sie nie gelebt. Bedenke dies und schreibe ihre Taten ihnen selbst zu und nicht uns.”
― Charles Dickens

 

 

 

 

 

 

“He stepped aside to the ledge where the vine leaves yet lay strewn about, collected two or three, and stood wiping his hands upon them, with his back to the light.”
― Charles Dickens, Little Dorrit

 

 

 

 

 

 

“the former; “our arrangement thus made, you have nothing to fear from me.” He sat down in a chair on the hearth, over against Mr. Lorry. When they were alone, Mr. Lorry asked him what he had done? “Not much. If it should go ill with the prisoner, I have ensured access to him, once.” Mr. Lorry’s countenance fell. “It is all I could do,” said Carton. “To propose too much, would be to put this man’s head under the axe, and, as he himself said, nothing worse could happen to him if he were denounced. It was obviously the weakness of the position. There is no help for it.”
― Charles Dickens, A Tale of Two Cities

 

 

 

 

 

“with a sharp nose like a sharp autumn evening, inclining to be frosty towards the end.”
― Charles Dickens, Bleak House

 

 

 

Charles Dickens Quotes Part 167

 

 

“These, with their perplexities and inconsistencies, were the shifting quicksands of my mind,”
― Charles Dickens, David Copperfield

 

 

 

 

 

 

“There with the wood-fire, which was beginning to burn low, rising and falling upon him in the dark room, he sat with his legs thrust out to warm, drinking the hot wine down to the lees, with a monstrous shadow imitating him on the wall and ceiling.”
― Charles Dickens, Little Dorrit

 

 

 

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