Charles Dickens Quotes Part 166

Charles Dickens Quotes Part 166: Charles John Huffam Dickens was an English writer and social critic. He created some of the world’s best-known fictional characters and is regarded by many as the greatest novelist of the Victorian era.

His works enjoyed unprecedented popularity during his lifetime and, by the 20th century, critics and scholars had recognised him as a literary genius. His novels and short stories are widely read today.

 

Charles Dickens Quotes Part 166

Charles dickens quotes

 

 

“…cand crepusculul da frau liber umbrelor tinute captive peste zi, si care acum se aduna laolalta ca la o adunare miscatoare de stafii ce ies de prin colturi de camere sau tasnesc de dupa usi intredeschise…”
― Dickens, Charles

 

 

 

 

 

“Preparation V. The Wine-shop VI. The Shoemaker Book the Second—the Golden Thread I. Five”
― Charles Dickens, A Tale of Two Cities

 

 

 

 

 

“in Storm V. The Wood-Sawyer VI. Triumph VII. A Knock at the Door VIII. A Hand at Cards”
― Charles Dickens, A Tale of Two Cities

 

 

 

 

“The world is a lively place enough, in which we must accommodate ourselves to circumstances, sail with the stream as glibly as we can, be content to take froth for substance, the surface for the depth, the counterfeit for the real coin. I wonder no philosopher has ever established that our globe itself is hollow. It should be, if Nature is consistent in her works.”
― Charles Dickens, Barnaby Rudge

 

Charles Dickens Quotes Part 166

 

 

“When the voice stopped, he put his hand over his eyes, murmuring”
― Charles Dickens, Little Dorrit

 

 

 

 

 

“at the Door VIII. A Hand at Cards IX. The Game Made X.”
― Charles Dickens, A Tale of Two Cities

 

 

 

 

 

“…’Ah me!’ said he, ‘what might have been is not what is!’
With which commentary on human life, indicating an experience of it not exclusively his own, he made the best of his way to the end of his journey. …”
― Charles Dickens, Our Mutual Friend

 

 

 

 

 

“as at this. Mrs. Southcott had recently attained her five-and-twentieth blessed birthday, of whom a prophetic”
― Charles Dickens, A Tale of Two Cities

 

 

Charles Dickens Quotes Part 166

 

 

“Go and be somethingological directly.”
― Charles Dickens, Hard Times

 

 

 

 

 

“Fellow of Delicacy XIII. The Fellow of No Delicacy XIV. The Honest Tradesman XV. Knitting XVI. Still”
― Charles Dickens, A Tale of Two Cities

 

 

 

 

 

 

“Oliver looked very worn and shadowy from sickness: and made an ineffectual attempt to stand up, out of respect to his benefactor: which terminated in his sinking back into the chair again; and the fact is, if the truth must be told, that Mr. Brownlow’s heart, being large enough for any six ordinary old gentlemen of humane disposition, forced a supply of tears into his eyes, by some hydraulic process which we are not sufficiently philosophical to be in a condition to explain.”
― Charles Dickens, Oliver Twist

 

 

 

 

 

 

“Era el mejor de los tiempos, era el peor de los tiempos, la edad de la sabiduría, y también de la locura; la época de las creencias y de la incredulidad; la era de la luz y de las tinieblas; la primavera de la esperanza y el invierno de la desesperación. Todo lo poseíamos, pero no teníamos nada; caminábamos en derechura al cielo y nos extraviábamos por el camino opuesto. En una palabra, aquella época era tan parecida a la actual, que nuestras más notables autoridades insisten en que, tanto en lo que se refiere al bien como al mal, sólo es aceptable la comparación en grado superlativo.”
― Charles Dickens, Historia de dos ciudades

 

 

Charles Dickens Quotes Part 166

 

 

“The whole business of the human race, between London and Dover, being spoliation, Mr Dorrit was waylaid at Dartford, pillaged at Gravesend, rifled at Rochester, fleeced at Sittingbourne, and sacked at Canterbury.”
― Charles Dickens, Little Dorrit

 

 

 

 

 

“He had not a handsome face, but it was better than handsome: being extremely amiable and cheerful.”
― Charles Dickens, Great Expectations

 

 

 

 

 

 

“It was Miss Murdstone who was arrived, and a gloomy-looking lady she was…She brought with her, two uncompromising hard black boxes, with her initials on the lids in hard brass nails. When she paid the coachman she took her money out of a hard steel purse, and she kept the purse in a very jail of a bag which hung upon her arm by a heavy chain, and shut up like a bite. I had never, at that time, seen such a metallic lady altogether as Miss Murdstone was.”
― Charles Dickens

 

 

Charles Dickens Quotes Part 166

 

 

“Now, what I want is Facts.”
― Charles Dickens, Hard Times

 

 

 

 

 

“Say that his power lies in words and looks; in things so slight and insignificant that it is impossible to add and count ’em up: What then? The happiness he gives is quite as great as if it cost a fortune.”
― Charles Dickens, A Christmas Carol / The Chimes / The Cricket on the Hearth

 

 

 

 

 

“I fear not yet. It would be dangerous for Charles yet.”
― Charles Dickens, A Tale of Two Cities

 

 

Charles Dickens Quotes Part 166

 

 

 

“Here is a man,” said the Captain, addressing himself to his fair auditors, and indicating the commander with his outstretched hook, “that has fell down more than any man alive; that has had more accidents happen to his own self than the Seamen’s Hospital to all hands; that took as many spars and bars and bolts about the outside of his head when he was young, as you’d want a order for on Chathamyard* to build a pleasure-yacht with; and yet that got his opinions in that way, it’s my belief, for there an’t nothing like ’em afloat or ashore.”
― Charles Dickens, Dombey and Son

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

“He was rather a low sort of pony. The fact is, he had been originally jobbed out by the day, and he never quite got over his old habits. He was clever in melodrama too, but too broad–too broad. When the mother died, he took the port-wine business.’
‘The port-wine business!’ cried Nicholas.
‘Drinking port-wine with the clown,’ said the manager; ‘but he was greedy, and one night bit off the bowl of the glass, and choked himself, so his vulgarity was the death of him at last.”
― Charles Dickens

 

 

 

 

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