Charles Dickens Quotes Part 160

Charles Dickens Quotes Part 160: Charles John Huffam Dickens was an English writer and social critic. He created some of the world’s best-known fictional characters and is regarded by many as the greatest novelist of the Victorian era.

His works enjoyed unprecedented popularity during his lifetime and, by the 20th century, critics and scholars had recognised him as a literary genius. His novels and short stories are widely read today.

 

Charles Dickens Quotes Part 160

Charles dickens quotes

 

“When we have traversed it, and look back from Albano, its dark, undulating surface lies below us like a stagnant lake, or like a broad, dull Lethe flowing round the walls of Rome, and separating it from all the world!  How often have the Legions, in triumphant march, gone glittering across that purple waste, so silent and unpeopled now!  How often has the train of captives looked, with sinking hearts, upon the distant city, and beheld its population pouring out, to hail the return of their conqueror!  What riot, sensuality and murder, have run mad in the vast palaces now heaps of brick and shattered marble!  What glare of fires, and roar of popular tumult, and wail of pestilence and famine, have come sweeping over the wild plain where nothing is now heard but the wind, and where the solitary lizards gambol unmolested in the sun!”
― Charles Dickens, Pictures from Italy

 

 

 

 

 

“    Here, in a large house, formerly a house of state, lives Mr. Tulkinghorn. It is let off in sets of chambers now, and in those shrunken fragments of its greatness, lawyers lie like maggots in nuts. But its roomy staircases, passages, and antechambers still remain; and even its painted ceilings, where Allegory, in Roman helmet and celestial linen, sprawls among balustrades and pillars, flowers, clouds, and big-legged boys, and makes the head ache—as would seem to be Allegory’s object always, more or less. Here, among his many boxes labelled with transcendent names, lives Mr. Tulkinghorn, when not speechlessly at home in country-houses where the great ones of the earth are bored to death. Here he is to-day, quiet at his table. An Oyster of the old school whom nobody can open.”
― Charles Dickens, Bleak House

 

 

 

 

“O, strânge-mă la pieptul tău, scumpul meu soț, căci dragostea mea e clădită pe stâncă și nu se va clătina niciodată!”
― Charles Dickens, David Copperfield

 

 

 

 

“great men are urged on to the abuse of power (when they need urging, which is not often), by their flatterers and dependents,”
― Charles Dickens, Barnaby Rudge: A Tale of the Riots of Eighty

 

 

 

Charles Dickens Quotes Part 160

 

“Among other public buildings in a certain town, which for many reasons it will be prudent to refrain from mentioning, and to which I will assign no fictitious name, there is one anciently common to most towns, great or small: to wit, a workhouse; and in this workhouse was born; on a day and date which I need not trouble myself to repeat, inasmuch as it can be of no possible consequence to the reader, in this stage of the business at all events; the item of mortality whose name is prefixed to the head of this chapter.”
― Charles Dickens, Oliver Twist

 

 

 

 

 

 

“It was the best of times, it was the worst of times, it was the age of wisdom, it was the age of foolishness, it was the epoch of belief, it was the epoch of incredulity, it was the season of Light, it was the season of Darkness, it was the spring of hope, it was the winter of despair, we had everything before us, we had nothing before us, we were all going direct to Heaven, we were all going direct the other way, in short, the period was so far like the present period, that some of its noisiest authorities insisted on its being received, for good or for evil, in the superlative degree of comparison only.”
― Charles Dickens, A Tale of Two Cities

 

 

 

 

 

“messages, as the spirits of this very year last past (supernaturally deficient in originality) rapped out theirs. Mere messages in the earthly order of events had lately come to the English Crown and People, from a congress of British subjects in America: which,”
― Charles Dickens, A Tale of Two Cities

 

 

 

 

 

“Si nos acobardamos porque oímos en algún lugar la llamada que tarde o temprano viene a buscar a todos los hombres, los objetivos que perseguimos se nos escaparán de las manos.”
― Charles Dickens, David Copperfield

 

 

Charles Dickens Quotes Part 160

 

 

“a brown composition, which looked like diluted pincushions without the covers, and was called porridge.”
― Charles Dickens, Nicholas Nickleby

 

 

 

 

 

 

“It is required of every man that the spirit within him should walk abroad among his fellowmen, and travel far and wide; and if that spirit goes not forth in life, it is condemned to do so after death. It is doomed to wander through the world–oh, woe is me!–and witness what it cannot share, but might have shared on earth, and turned into happiness.”
― Charles Dickens, A Christmas Carol

 

 

 

 

 

“A word in earnest is as good as a speech”
― Charles Dickens, Bleak House

 

 

 

 

 

“Dear, gentle, patient, noble Nell . . . .”
― Charles Dickens, The Old Curiosity Shop

 

 

 

Charles Dickens Quotes Part 160

 

 

“¡Sentimentalismos! No, no tengo tiempo para ello, pues me paso la vida ocupado en mover inmensas sumas de dinero.”
― Charles Dickens, Historia de dos ciudades

 

 

 

 

 

 

“The streets were very clean, very sunny, very empty, and very dull. A few idle men lounged about the two inns, and the empty market-place, and the tradesmen’s doors, and some old people were dozing in chairs outside an alms-house wall; but scarcely any passengers who seemed bent on going anywhere, or to have any object in view, went by; and if perchance some straggler did, his footsteps echoed on the hot bright pavement for minutes afterwards. Nothing seemed to be going on but the clocks, and they had such drowzy faces, such heavy lazy hands, and such cracked voices that they surely must have been too slow. The very dogs were all asleep, and the flies, drunk with moist sugar in the grocer’s shop, forgot their wings and briskness, and baked to death in dusty corners of the window.”
― Charles Dickens, The Old Curiosity Shop

 

 

 

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