Charles Dickens Quotes Part 157

Charles Dickens Quotes Part 157: Charles John Huffam Dickens was an English writer and social critic. He created some of the world’s best-known fictional characters and is regarded by many as the greatest novelist of the Victorian era.

His works enjoyed unprecedented popularity during his lifetime and, by the 20th century, critics and scholars had recognised him as a literary genius. His novels and short stories are widely read today.

 

Charles Dickens Quotes Part 157

Charles dickens quotes

 

 

“Company, you see – company is – is – it’s a very different thing from solitude – an’t it?”
― Charles Dickens, The Pickwick Papers

 

 

 

 

 

“That sprung up between us.  You are not truly happy”
― Charles Dickens, The Mystery of Edwin Drood

 

 

 

 

 

 

“simt că oriunde se arată Agnes, radiază pace, bunătate și adevăr, și că acea lumină blândă a vitraliului, pe care o văzusem cândva la biserică, o învăluie întotdeauna și mă învăluie și pe mine, precum și toate lucrurile din jur, ori de câte ori mă aflu în preajma ei.”
― Charles Dickens, David Copperfield

 

 

 

 

 

“Darkness XIII. Fifty-two XIV. The Knitting Done XV. The Footsteps Die Out For Ever”
― Charles Dickens, A Tale of Two Cities

 

 

Charles Dickens Quotes Part 157

 

 

“So new to him,” she muttered, “so old to me; so strange to him, so familiar to me; so melancholy to both of us! Call Estella.”
― Charles Dickens, Great Expectations

 

 

 

 

 

 

“There was a curious mixture in the boy, of uncompleted savagery, and uncompleted civilization.”
― Charles Dickens, Our Mutual Friend

 

 

 

 

 

 

“Personal faintness, and an overpowering personal candour, were the distinguishing features of Mrs Billickin’s organization. She came languishing out from her own exclusive back parlour, with the air of having been expressly brought-to for the purpose, from an accumulation of several swoons.”
― Charles Dickens

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

“Of the riders in the tumbrils, some observe these things, and all things on their last roadside, with an impassive stare; others, with a lingering interest in the ways of life and men. Some, seated with drooping heads, are sunk in silent despair; again, there are some so heedful of their looks that they cast upon the multitude such glances as they have seen in theatres, and in pictures. Several close their eyes, and think, or try to get their straying thoughts together. Only one, and he a miserable creature, of a crazed aspect, is so shattered and made drunk by horror, that he sings, and tries to dance. Not one of the whole number appeals by look or gesture, to the pity of the people.”
― Charles Dickens, A Tale of Two Cities

 

 

Charles Dickens Quotes Part 157

 

 

 

“You are wery obligin’, sir,’ replied Sam. ‘Now, don’t allow yourself to be fatigued beyond your powers; there’s a amiable bein’. Consider what you owe to society, and don’t let yourself be injured by too much work. For the sake o’ your feller-creeturs, keep yourself as quiet as you can; only think what a loss you would be!’ With these pathetic words, Sam Weller departed.”
― Charles Dickens, The Pickwick Papers

 

 

 

 

 

 

“tumbrils of the Revolution. But that Woodman and that Farmer,”
― Charles Dickens, A Tale of Two Cities

 

 

 

 

 

“However, as Mrs. Chillip says, sir, they undergo a continual punishment; for they are turned inward, to feed upon their own hearts, and their own hearts are very bad feeding.”
― Charles Dickens, David Copperfield

 

 

 

 

 

 

“Ask no questions, and you’ll be told no lies.”
― Charles Dickens, Great Expectations

 

 

Charles Dickens Quotes Part 157

 

 

 

“We are friends,” said I, rising and bending over her, as she rose from the bench. “And will continue friends apart,” said Estella. I took her hand in mine, and we went out of the ruined place; and, as the morning mists had risen long ago when I first left the forge, so the evening mists were rising now, and in all the broad expanse of tranquil light they showed to me, I saw no shadow of another parting from her.”
― Charles Dickens, Great Expectations

 

 

 

 

 

“When the French come over, May we meet them at Dover!”
― Charles Dickens, The Mystery of Edwin Drood

 

 

 

 

 

 

“You are to be in all things regulated and governed,’ said the gentleman, ‘by fact. ”
― Charles Dickens, Hard Times: The Original Classics – Illustrated

 

 

 

 

 

 

“Dig—dig—dig—until an impatient movement from one of the two passengers would admonish him to pull up the window, draw his arm securely through the leathern strap, and speculate upon the two slumbering forms, until his mind lost its hold of them, and they again slid away into the bank and the grave. “Buried how long?” “Almost eighteen years.” “You had abandoned all hope of being dug out?” “Long ago.” The words were still in his hearing as just spoken—distinctly in his hearing as ever spoken words had been in his”
― Charles Dickens, A Tale of Two Cities

 

 

 

Charles Dickens Quotes Part 157

 

 

“I had seen the damp lying on the outside of my little window, as if some goblin had been crying there all night, and using the window for a pocket-handkerchief.”
― Charles Dickens, Great Expectations

 

 

 

 

 

“–Soy muy sensible y cariñosa –aseguró Dora–; no deberías ser tan cruel conmigo, Doady.”
― Charles Dickens, David Copperfield

 

 

 

 

 

“Pășesc în casa fermecată, plină de lumini, de larmă, de muzică, de flori și (îmi pare rău să constat) de ofițeri, și o găsesc pe miss Larkins strălucitor de frumoasă. Poartă o rochie albastră și flori mici albastre — flori de nu-mă-uita — în păr. Ca și cum dânsa ar avea nevoie să poarte nu-mă-uita!”
― Charles Dickens, David Copperfield

 

 

 

 

 

“period, that some of its noisiest authorities insisted on its being received, for good or for evil, in the superlative degree of comparison only.”
― Charles Dickens, A Tale of Two Cities

 

 

 

Charles Dickens Quotes Part 157

 

“Well, it was really very pleasant to see how things lazily adapted themselves to purposes. Here was this Mr Gridley, a man of a robust will, and surprising energy—intellectually speaking, a sort of inharmonious blacksmith*—and he could easily imagine that there Gridley was, years ago, wandering about in life for something to expend his superfluous combativeness upon—a sort of Young Love among the thorns—when the Court of Chancery came in his way, and accommodated him with the exact thing he wanted. There they were, matched, ever afterwards! Otherwise he might have been a great general, blowing up all sorts of towns, or he might have been a great politician, dealing in all sorts of parliamentary rhetoric; but, as it was, he and the Court of Chancery had fallen upon each other in the pleasantest way, and nobody was much the worse, and Gridley was, so to speak, from that hour provided for.”
― Charles Dickens, Bleak House

 

 

 

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