Charles Dickens Quotes Part 156

Charles Dickens Quotes Part 156: Charles John Huffam Dickens was an English writer and social critic. He created some of the world’s best-known fictional characters and is regarded by many as the greatest novelist of the Victorian era.

His works enjoyed unprecedented popularity during his lifetime and, by the 20th century, critics and scholars had recognized him as a literary genius. His novels and short stories are widely read today.

 

Charles Dickens Quotes Part 156

Charles dickens quotes

 

“The third gentleman now stepped forth.  A mighty man at cutting and drying, he was; a government officer; in his way (and in most other people’s too), a professed pugilist; always in training, always with a system to force down the general throat like a bolus, always to be heard of at the bar of his little Public-office, ready to fight all England.  To continue in fistic phraseology, he had a genius for coming up to the scratch, wherever and whatever it was, and proving himself an ugly customer.  He would go in and damage any subject whatever with his right, follow up with his left, stop, exchange, counter, bore his opponent (he always fought All England) to the ropes, and fall upon him neatly.  He was certain to knock the wind out of common sense, and render that unlucky adversary deaf to the call of time.  And he had it in charge from high authority to bring about the great public-office Millennium, when Commissioners should reign upon earth.   ‘Very”
― Charles Dickens, Hard Times: The Original Classics – Illustrated

 

 

 

 

 

“And what’s the best of all, you’ve been more comfortable a longer me, since I was under a dark cloud, than when the sun shone. That’s best of all.”
― Charles Dickens, Great Expectations

 

 

 

 

 

“It was evident from the general tone of the whole party, that they had come to regard insolvency as the normal state of mankind, and the payment of debts as a disease that occasionally broke out. In this strange scene, and with these strange spectres flitting about him, Arthur Clennam looked on at the preparations as if they were part of a dream.”
― Charles Dickens, Works of Charles Dickens

 

 

 

 

 

 

“Do you want to be a gentleman, to spite her or to gain her over?” Biddy quietly asked me, after a pause. “I don’t know,” I moodily answered. “Because, if it is to spite her,” Biddy pursued, “I should think—but you know best—that might be better and more independently done by caring nothing for her words. And if it is to gain her over, I should think—but you know best—she was not worth gaining over.” Exactly what I myself had thought, many times. Exactly what was perfectly manifest to me at the moment. But how could I, a poor dazed village lad, avoid that wonderful inconsistency into which the best and wisest of men fall every day?”
― Charles Dickens, Great Expectations

 

 

Charles Dickens Quotes Part 156

 

 

 

“Slight and ridiculous as the incident was, it made him appear such a little fiend, and withal such a keen and knowing one, that the old woman felt too much afraid of him to utter a single word, and suffered herself to be led with extraordinary politeness to the breakfast-table. Here he by no means diminished the impression he had just produced, for he ate hard eggs, shell and all, devoured gigantic prawns with the heads and tails on, chewed tobacco and water-cresses at the same time and with extraordinary greediness, drank boiling tea without winking, bit his fork and spoon till they bent again, and in short performed so many horrifying and uncommon acts that the women were nearly frightened out of their wits, and began to doubt if he were really a human creature.”
― Charles Dickens, The Old Curiosity Shop

 

 

 

 

 

 

“Plea XXI. Echoing Footsteps XXII. The Sea Still Rises XXIII. Fire Rises XXIV. Drawn to the Loadstone Rock”
― Charles Dickens, A Tale of Two Cities

 

 

 

 

 

 

“It was the best of times, it was the worst of times,”
― Charles Dickens

 

 

 

 

 

“Yes, sir!’ from one half.  ‘No, sir!’ from the other.   ‘Of”
― Charles Dickens, Hard Times: The Original Classics – Illustrated

 

 

 

Charles Dickens Quotes Part 156

 

 

“May I ask you if you have ever had an opportunity of remarking, down in your part of the country, that the children of not exactly suitable marriages, are always most particularly anxious to be married?”
― Charles Dickens, Great Expectations

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

“I have always thought of Christmas time, when it has come round–apart from the veneration due to its sacred name and origin, if anything belonging to it can be apart from that–as a good time; a kind, forgiving, charitable, pleasant time; the only time I know of, in the long calendar of the year, when men and women seem by one consent to open their shut-up hearts freely, and to think of people below them as if they really were fellow-passengers to the grave, and not another race of creatures bound on other journeys. And therefore, uncle, though it has never put a scrap of gold or silver in my pocket, I believe that it has done me good, and will do me good; and I say, God bless it!”
― Charles Dickens, A Christmas Carol

 

 

 

 

 

 

“Its other name was Satis; which is Greek,
or Latin, or Hebrew, or all three – or all one to me – for enough.’
‘Enough House,’ said I; ‘that’s a curious name, miss.’
‘Yes,’ she replied; ‘but it meant more than it said. It meant, when it was given, that whoever had this house, could want nothing else.”
― Charles Dickens, Great Expectations

 

 

Charles Dickens Quotes Part 156

 

 

 

“IT WAS THE FIRST TIME THAT A GRAVE HAD OPENED IN MY ROAD OF LIFE, AND the gap it made in the smooth ground was wonderful.”
― Charles Dickens, Great Expectations

 

 

 

 

 

“I assumed my first undivided responsibility.”
― Charles Dickens, Great Expectations

 

 

 

 

 

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