Charles Dickens Quotes Part 150

Charles Dickens Quotes Part 150: Charles John Huffam Dickens was an English writer and social critic. He created some of the world’s best-known fictional characters and is regarded by many as the greatest novelist of the Victorian era.

His works enjoyed unprecedented popularity during his lifetime and, by the 20th century, critics and scholars had recognised him as a literary genius. His novels and short stories are widely read today.

 

Charles Dickens Quotes Part 150

Charles dickens quotes

 

 

“What are the fifty newspapers, which those precocious urchins are bawling down the street, and which are kept filed within, what are they but amusements? Not vapid, waterish amusements, but good strong stuff; dealing in round abuse and blackguard names; pulling off the roofs of private houses, as the Halting Devil did in Spain; pimping and pandering for all degrees of vicious taste, and gorging with coined lies the most voracious maw; imputing to every man in public life the coarsest and the vilest motives; scaring away from the stabbed and prostrate body-politic, every Samaritan of clear conscience and good deeds; and setting on, with yell and whistle and the clapping of foul hands, the vilest vermin and worst birds of prey.”
― Charles Dickens, The Complete Works of Charles Dickens

 

 

 

 

 

“evening, they began to think that although he could never hope to be an Englishman, still it would be hard to visit that affliction on his head. They began to accommodate themselves to his level, calling him ‘Mr Baptist,’ but treating him like a baby, and laughing immoderately at his lively gestures and his childish English—more,”
― Charles Dickens, Little Dorrit

 

 

 

 

 

“their national muskets in a most explosive state of readiness, who stopped all comers and goers,”
― Charles Dickens, A Tale of Two Cities

 

 

 

 

 

“Ama-a, ama-a, ama-a. Se ela favorecer-te, ama-a. Se ela ferir-te, ama-a. Se ela te despedaçar o coração, que à medida que envelhecer e ficar mais forte, sangrará mais, ama-a, ama-a, ama-a!”
― Charles Dickens, Great Expectations

 

 

Charles Dickens Quotes Part 150

 

“eighteen years a secret and unaccused prisoner in the Bastille;”
― Charles Dickens, A Tale of Two Cities

 

 

 

 

 

“curious kind of pleasure in lingering among these houses of the dead, and read the inscriptions on the tombs of the good people (a great number of good people were buried there), passing on from one to another with increasing interest. It was a very quiet place, as such a place should be, save for the cawing of the rooks who had built their nests among the branches of some tall old trees, and were calling to one another, high up in the air. First, one sleek bird, hovering near his ragged house as it swung and dangled in the wind, uttered his hoarse cry, quite by chance as it would seem, and in a sober tone as though he were but talking to himself. Another answered, and he called again, but louder than before; then another spoke and then another; and each time the first, aggravated by contradiction, insisted on his case more strongly. Other voices, silent till now, struck in from boughs lower down and higher up and midway, and to the right and left, and from the tree-tops; and others, arriving hastily from the grey church turrets and old belfry window, joined the clamour which rose and fell, and swelled and dropped again, and still went on; and all this noisy contention amidst a skimming to and fro, and lighting on fresh branches, and frequent change of place, which satirised the old restlessness of those who lay so still beneath the moss and turf below, and the strife in which they had worn away their lives. Frequently raising her eyes to the trees”
― Charles Dickens, The Old Curiosity Shop

 

 

 

 

 

“I believe, sir,’ said Richard Swiveller, taking his pen out of his mouth, ‘that you desire to look at these apartments. They are very charming apartments, sir. They command an uninterrupted view of – of over the way, and they are within one minute’s walk of – of the corner of the street.”
― Charles Dickens, The Old Curiosity Shop

 

 

 

 

 

“I went to school with this fellow, Lawrence Boythorn,” said Mr. Jarndyce, tapping the letter as he laid it on the table, “more than five and forty years ago. He was then the most impetuous boy in the world, and he is now the most impetuous man. He was then the loudest boy in the world, and he is now the loudest man. He was then the heartiest and sturdiest boy in the world, and he is now the heartiest and sturdiest man. He is a tremendous fellow.”
― Charles Dickens, Bleak House

 

Charles Dickens Quotes Part 150

 

 

“On the stairs I encountered Wemmick, who was coming down, after an unsuccessful application of his knuckles to my door.”
― Charles Dickens, Great Expectations

 

 

 

 

 

“Went down into a modest life of usefulness and happiness. Went down to give a mother’s care, in the fulness of time, to Fanny’s neglected children no less than to their own, and to leave that lady going into Society for ever and a day.”
― Charles Dickens, Little Dorrit

 

 

 

 

 

“Eu vou dizer-te o que é o amor verdadeiro. É o devotamento cego, humilhação de si mesmo sem questionamento, submissão absoluta, é fé e confiança contra si mesmo e contra o mundo inteiro, é entregar-se de corpo e alma ao carrasco… Foi assim que amei!”
― Charles Dickens, Great Expectations

 

 

 

 

 

“No século XIX, somente Balzac, na França, dispôs de comunicação análoga.”
― Charles Dickens, David Copperfield

 

 

Charles Dickens Quotes Part 150

 

“I would ask you to believe that he has a heart he very, very seldom reveals and that there are deep wounds in it. My dear, I have seen it bleeding.”
― Charles Dickens, A Tale of Two Cities – Charles Dickens: Annotated

 

 

 

 

“her five-and-twentieth blessed birthday, of whom a prophetic private in the Life Guards had heralded the sublime appearance by announcing that arrangements were made for the swallowing up of London and Westminster.”
― Charles Dickens, A Tale of Two Cities

 

 

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