Charles Dickens Quotes Part 147

Charles Dickens Quotes Part 147: Charles John Huffam Dickens was an English writer and social critic. He created some of the world’s best-known fictional characters and is regarded by many as the greatest novelist of the Victorian era.

His works enjoyed unprecedented popularity during his lifetime and, by the 20th century, critics and scholars had recognised him as a literary genius. His novels and short stories are widely read today.

 

Charles Dickens Quotes Part 147

Charles dickens quotes

 

 

 

 

“thought”
― Charles Dickens, A Tale of Two Cities

 

 

 

 

 

“the Cottage of content was better than the Palace of cold splendour, and that where love was, all was.”
― Charles Dickens, David Copperfield

 

 

 

 

 

“How could I, a poor dazed village lad, avoid that wonderful inconsistency into which the best and wisest of men fall every day?”
― Charles Dickens, Great Expectations

 

 

 

 

 

“won, I recollect, by an old lady with a hand-basket, who, very reluctantly, produced from it the stipulated five shillings, all in halfpence, and twopence halfpenny short—as it took an immense time”
― Charles Dickens, David Copperfield

 

 

Charles Dickens Quotes Part 147

 

 

“were, generally, as ignorant a set as any schoolboys in existence; they were too much troubled and knocked about to learn; they could no more do that to advantage, than any one can do anything to advantage in a life of constant misfortune, torment, and worry.”
― Charles Dickens, David Copperfield

 

 

 

 

 

“It was the best of times,
it was the worst of times,
it was the age of wisdom,
it was the age of foolishness,
it was the epoch of belief,
it was the epoch of incredulity,
it was the season of Light,
it was the season of Darkness,
it was the spring of hope,
it was the winter of despair, we had everything before us, we had nothing before us,”
― Charles Dickens, A Tale of Two Cities

 

 

 

 

 

 

“When he had put up his things for the night he took out his flute, and blew at it, until I almost thought he would gradually blow his whole being into the large hole at the top, and ooze away at the keys.”
― Charles Dickens, David Copperfield

 

 

 

 

 

 

“…Be what you like’
‘Some people, sir,’ remarked Lamps, ‘are sometimes what they don’t like.’
‘Nobody knows that better than I do,’ sighed the other. ‘I have been what I don’t like, all my life.”
― Charles Dickens, Mugby Junction

 

 

 

Charles Dickens Quotes Part 147

 

 

“Neither clock nor weather-glass is ever right; but we believe in both, devoutly.”
― Charles Dickens, David Copperfield

 

 

 

 

 

 

“The terrors that had assailed me whenever Mrs. Joe had gone near the pantry, or out of the room, were only to be equalled by the remorse with which my mind dwelt on what my hands had done.”
― Charles Dickens, GREAT EXPECTATIONS

 

 

 

 

 

 

“I. The Period It was the best of times, it was the worst of times, it was the age of wisdom, it was the age of foolishness, it was the epoch of belief, it was the epoch of incredulity, it was the season of Light, it was the season of Darkness, it was the spring of hope, it was the winter of despair,”
― Charles Dickens, A Tale of Two Cities

 

 

 

 

 

“Pride is not all of one kind.”
― Charles Dickens, Great Expectations

 

 

Charles Dickens Quotes Part 147

 

 

“incluso se decía que, más de una vez, se vio a Carton en pleno día, dirigiéndose a su casa con paso vacilante, como gato calavera.”
― Charles Dickens, Historia de dos ciudades

 

 

 

 

 

 

“The Grindstone III. The Shadow IV. Calm in Storm V. The Wood-Sawyer”
― Charles Dickens, A Tale of Two Cities

 

 

 

 

 

“I am agreeable to anything which is agreeable to Mr Giles,’ said a shorter man; who was no means of a slim figure, and who was very pale in the face, and very polite: as frightened men frequently are.”
― Charles Dickens, Oliver Twist

 

 

 

Charles Dickens Quotes Part 147

 

 

“Into this shop, which was low and small, and which was darkened rather than lighted by a little window, overhung with clothes, and was descended into by some steps, I went with a palpitating heart; which was not relieved when an ugly old man, with the lower part of his face all covered with a stubbly grey beard, rushed out of a dirty den behind it, and seized me by the hair of my head. He was a dreadful old man to look at, in a filthy flannel waistcoat, and smelling terribly of rum. His bedstead, covered with a tumbled and ragged piece of patchwork, was in the den he had come from, where another little window showed a prospect of more stinging-nettles, and a lame donkey. ‘Oh, what do you want?’ grinned this old man, in a fierce, monotonous whine. ‘Oh, my eyes and limbs, what do you want? Oh, my lungs and liver, what do you want? Oh, goroo, goroo!’ I was so much dismayed by these words, and particularly by the repetition of the last unknown one, which was a kind of rattle in his throat, that I could make no answer; hereupon the old man, still holding me by the hair, repeated: ‘Oh, what do you want? Oh, my eyes and limbs, what do you want? Oh, my lungs and liver, what do you want? Oh, goroo!’—which he screwed out of himself, with an energy that made his eyes start in his head. ‘I wanted to know,’ I said, trembling, ‘if you would buy a jacket.’ ‘Oh, let’s see the jacket!’ cried the old man. ‘Oh, my heart on fire, show the jacket to us! Oh, my eyes and limbs, bring the jacket out!’ With that he took his trembling hands, which were like the claws of a great bird, out of my hair; and put on a pair of spectacles, not at all ornamental to his inflamed eyes. ‘Oh, how much for the jacket?’ cried the old man, after examining it. ‘Oh—goroo!—how much for the jacket?’ ‘Half-a-crown,’ I answered, recovering myself. ‘Oh, my lungs and liver,’ cried the old man, ‘no! Oh, my eyes, no! Oh, my limbs, no! Eighteenpence. Goroo!’ Every time he uttered this ejaculation, his eyes seemed to be in danger of starting out; and every sentence he spoke, he delivered in a sort of tune, always exactly the same, and more like a gust of wind, which begins low, mounts up high, and falls again, than any other comparison I can find for it.”
― Charles Dickens, David Copperfield

 

 

 

 

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