Charles Dickens Quotes Part 144

Charles Dickens Quotes Part 144: Charles John Huffam Dickens was an English writer and social critic. He created some of the world’s best-known fictional characters and is regarded by many as the greatest novelist of the Victorian era.

His works enjoyed unprecedented popularity during his lifetime and, by the 20th century, critics and scholars had recognised him as a literary genius. His novels and short stories are widely read today.

 

Charles Dickens Quotes Part 144

Charles dickens quotes

 

“It was the best of times, it was the worst of times, it was the age of wisdom, it was the age of foolishness, it was the epoch of belief, it was the epoch of incredulity, it was the season of Light, it was the season of Darkness, it was the spring of hope, it was the winter of despair, we had everything before us, we had nothing before us, we”
― Charles Dickens, A Tale of Two Cities

 

 

 

 

 

“And that,’ said Mrs Gowan, shaking her despondent head, ‘that’s all. That,’ repeated Mrs Gowan, furling her green fan for the moment, and tapping her chin with it (it was on the way to being a double chin; might be called a chin and a half at present), ‘that’s all! On the death of the old people, I suppose there will be more to come; but how it may be restricted or locked up, I don’t know. And as to that, they may live for ever. My dear, they are just the kind of people to do it.’ Now, Mrs Merdle, who really knew her friend Society pretty well, and who knew what”
― Charles Dickens, Little Dorrit

 

 

 

 

“I don’t know when, but apparently ages ago—about”
― Charles Dickens, David Copperfield

 

 

Charles Dickens Quotes Part 144

 

 

“and I fancied I was little Pip again.”
― Charles Dickens, Great Expectations

 

 

 

 

 

 

“when Goblin clutches me by the wrist, and lays, not her skinny finger, but the handle of a key, upon her lip.  She invites me, with a jerk, to follow her.  I do so.  She leads me out into a room adjoining – a rugged room, with a funnel-shaped, contracting roof, open at the top, to the bright day.  I ask her what it is.  She folds her arms, leers hideously, and stares.  I ask again.  She glances round, to see that all the little company are there; sits down upon a mound of stones; throws up her arms, and yells out, like a fiend, ‘La Salle de la Question!’
The Chamber of Torture!  And the roof was made of that shape to stifle the victim’s cries!  Oh Goblin, Goblin, let us think of this awhile, in silence.  Peace, Goblin!  Sit with your short arms crossed on your short legs, upon that heap of stones, for only five minutes, and then flame out again.”
― Charles Dickens, Pictures from Italy

 

 

 

 

 

 

“La vita senza l’amore di Dora non era una cosa accettabile da nessun punto di vista. Non potevo sopportarla, e non l’avrei fatto. L’avevo amata ogni minuto, giorno e notte, da quando l’avevo vista la prima volta. L’amavo in quel momento alla follia. Gli amanti avevano amato prima, e avrebbero amato dopo; ma nessuno di loro aveva amato, né avrebbe voluto, potuto o saputo amare mai come io amavo Dora.”
― Charles Dickens, David Copperfield

 

 

 

Charles Dickens Quotes Part 144

 

 

“Much of my unassisted self, and more by the help of Biddy than of Mr. Wopsle’s great-aunt, I struggled through the alphabet as if it had been a bramble-bush; getting considerably worried and scratched by every letter. After that I fell among those thieves, the nine figures, who seemed every evening to do something new to disguise themselves and baffle recognition. But, at last I began, in a purblind groping way, to read, write, and cipher, on the very smallest scale. One”
― Charles Dickens, Great Expectations

 

 

 

 

 

“There is nothing half so green that I know anywhere, as the grass of that churchyard; nothing half so shady as its”
― Charles Dickens, David Copperfield

 

 

 

 

 

“For precious secrets in reference to beer, am I likewise beholden to him, involving warning against the beer of a certain establishment, by reason of its having turned sour through failure in point of demand: though my young sage is not of opinion that similar deterioration has befallen the ale. ”
― Charles Dickens, The Uncommercial Traveller

 

 

 

Charles Dickens Quotes Part 144

 

“At this festive season of the year, Mr. Scrooge,” said the gentleman, taking up a pen, “it is more than usually desirable that we should make some slight provision for the poor and destitute, who suffer greatly at the present time. Many thousands are in want of common necessaries; hundreds of thousands are in want of common”
― Charles Dickens, A Christmas Carol

 

 

 

 

 

 

“. . . such a rush immediately ensued that she with laughing face and plundered dress was borne towards it the centre of a flushed and boisterous group, just in time to greet the father, who came home attended by a man laden with Christmas toys and presents. Then the shouting and the struggling, and the onslaught that was made on the defenceless porter! Then scaling him, with chairs for ladders, to dive into his pockets, despoil him of brown-paper parcels, hold on tight by his cravat, hug him round the neck, pommel his back and kick his legs in irrepressible affection! The shouts of wonder and delight with wich the development of every package was received! The terrible announcement that the baby had been taken in the act of putting a doll’s frying-pan into his mouth, and was more than suspected of having swallowed a fictitious turkey, glued on a wooden platter! The immense relief of finding this false alarm! The joy, and gratitude, and ecstasy! They are indescribable alike. It is enough that by degrees the children and their emotions got out of the parlor, and by one stair at a time up to the top of the house; where they went to bed, and so subsided.”
― Charles Dickens, A Christmas Carol and The Night Before Christmas

 

 

 

 

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