Charles Dickens Quotes Part 141

Charles Dickens Quotes Part 141: Charles John Huffam Dickens was an English writer and social critic. He created some of the world’s best-known fictional characters and is regarded by many as the greatest novelist of the Victorian era.

His works enjoyed unprecedented popularity during his lifetime and, by the 20th century, critics and scholars had recognised him as a literary genius. His novels and short stories are widely read today.

 

Charles Dickens Quotes Part 141

Charles dickens quotes

 

 

“I knew not how to answer, or how to comfort her. That she had done a grievous thing in taking an impressionable child to mould into the form that her wild resentment, spurned affection, and wounded pride, found vengeance in, I knew full well. But that, and shutting out the light of day, she had shut out infinitely more; that, in seclusion, she had secluded herself from a thousand natural and healing influences; that, her mind, brooding solitary, had grown diseased, as all minds do and must and will that reverse the appointed order of their Maker; I knew equally well. And could I look upon her without compassion, seeing her punishments in the ruin she was, in her profound unfitness for this Earth on which she was placed, in the vanity of sorrow which had become a master mania, like the vanity of penitence, the vanity of remorse, the vanity of unworthiness, and other monstrous vanities that have been curses in this world?”
― Charles Dickens , Great Expectations

 

 

 

 

 

“it was such a curious corner in its acoustical properties, such a peculiar Ear of a place, that as Mr. Loory stood at the open window, looking for the father and daughter whose steps he heard, he fancied they would never approach. Not only would the echoes die away, as thought the steps had gone; but, echoes of other steps that never came would be heard in their stead, and would die away for good when they seemed close at hand. However, father and daughter did at last appear, and Miss Pross was ready at the street door to receive them.”
― Charles Dickens, A Tale of Two Cities

 

 

 

 

 

“My father’s family name being Pirrip, and my Christian name Philip, my infant tongue could make of both names nothing longer or more explicit than Pip. So, I called myself Pip, and came to be called Pip.”
― Charles Dickens, Great Expectations

 

 

 

Charles Dickens Quotes Part 141

 

 

“to prove to her. It is a fact which will be long remembered as remarkable down there, that she was never drowned, but died triumphantly in bed, at ninety”
― Charles Dickens, David Copperfield

 

 

 

 

 

 

“his face thrown up to the sky, and his head hanging down; then recovered himself, fumbled with his cap, and made a bow.”
― Charles Dickens, A Tale of Two Cities

 

 

 

 

“reached”
― Charles Dickens, David Copperfield

 

 

 

 

 

“So-ho!” the guard sang out, as loud as he could roar. “Yo there! Stand! I shall fire!” The pace was suddenly”
― Charles Dickens, A Tale of Two Cities

 

 

Charles Dickens Quotes Part 141

 

 

“year last past (supernaturally deficient in originality) rapped out theirs. Mere messages in the earthly order of events had lately come to the English Crown and People, from a congress of British subjects in America: which, strange”
― Charles Dickens, A Tale of Two Cities

 

 

 

 

 

 

“Her reverting to this tone, as if our association were forced upon us and we were mere puppets, gave me pain; but everything in our intercourse did give me pain. Whatever her tone with me happened to be, I could put no trust in it, and build no hope on it; and yet I went on against trust and against hope. Why repeat it a thousand times? So it always was.”
― Charles Dickens, Great Expectations

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

“    Miss Witherfield retired, deeply impressed with the magistrate’s learning and research; Mr. Nupkins retired to lunch; Mr. Jinks retired within himself—that being the only retirement he had, except the sofa-bedstead in the small parlour which was occupied by his landlady’s family in the daytime—and Mr. Grummer retired, to wipe out, by his mode of discharging his present commission, the insult which had been fastened upon himself, and the other representative of his Majesty—the beadle—in the course of the morning.”
― Charles Dickens, The Pickwick Papers

 

 

 

 

Charles Dickens Quotes Part 141

 

 

“I. The Period It was the best of times,
it was the worst of times,
it was the age of wisdom,
it was the age of foolishness,
it was the epoch of belief,
it was the epoch of incredulity,
it was the season of Light,
it was the season of Darkness,
it was the spring of hope,
it was the winter of despair, we had everything before us, we had nothing before us, we were all going direct to Heaven,”
― Charles Dickens, A Tale of Two Cities

 

 

 

 

 

 

“Christmas-time, when it has come round—apart from the veneration due to its sacred name and origin, if anything belonging to it can be apart from that—as a good time; a kind, forgiving, charitable, pleasant time; the only time I know of, in the long calendar of the year, when men and women seem by one consent to open their shut-up hearts freely, and to think of people below them as if they really were fellow-passengers to the grave.”
― Charles Dickens, A Christmas Carol

 

 

 

 

 

 

“Nasci em Blunderstone, Suffolk, ou “por ali”, como dizem na Escócia. Fui filho póstumo. Os olhos de meu pai estavam fechados para a luz deste mundo havia seis meses quando os meus se abriram para ele.”
― Charles Dickens, David Copperfield

 

 

Charles Dickens Quotes Part 141

 

 

“I came here,’ said Dick, rather oblivious of the purpose with which he had really come, ‘with my bosom expanded, my heart dilated, and my sentiments of a corresponding description. I go away with feelings that may be conceived but cannot be described, feeling within myself that desolating truth that my best affections have experienced this night a stifler!”
― Charles Dickens, The Old Curiosity Shop

 

 

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