Charles Dickens Quotes Part 139

Charles Dickens Quotes Part 139: Charles John Huffam Dickens was an English writer and social critic. He created some of the world’s best-known fictional characters and is regarded by many as the greatest novelist of the Victorian era.

His works enjoyed unprecedented popularity during his lifetime and, by the 20th century, critics and scholars had recognised him as a literary genius. His novels and short stories are widely read today.

 

Charles Dickens Quotes Part 139

Charles dickens quotes

 

“It’s rather sudden,’ said Dick shaking his head with a look of infinite wisdom, and running on (as he was accustomed to do) with scraps of verse as if they were only prose in a hurry; ‘when the heart of a man is depressed with fears, the mist is dispelled when Miss Wackles appears; she’s a very nice girl. She’s like the red red rose that’s newly sprung in June—there’s no denying that—she’s also like a melody that’s sweetly played in tune.”
― Charles Dickens, The Old Curiosity Shop

 

 

 

 

 

 

“•”Dignity, and even holiness too, sometimes, are more questions of coat and waistcoat than some people imagine.”
-Charles Dickens, Oliver Twist, Ch. 37”
― -Charles Dickens

 

 

 

 

 

 

“There was nothing of high mark in this. They were not a handsome family; they were not well dressed; their shoes were far from being waterproof; their clothes were scanty; and Peter might have known, and very likely did, the inside of a pawnbroker’s. But, they were happy, grateful, pleased with one another, and contented with the time.”
― Charles Dickens, A Christmas Carol

 

 

 

 

 

 

“Men who are thoroughly false and hollow, seldom try to hide those vices from themselves; and yet in very act of avowing them, they lay claim to the virtues they feign most to despise”
― Charles Dickens, Barnaby Rudge

 

 

Charles Dickens Quotes Part 139

 

 

 

“When they took a young man into Tellson’s London house, they hid him somewhere till he was old. They kept him in a dark place, like a cheese, until he had the full Tellson flavour and blue-mould upon him.”
― Charles Dickens, A Tale of Two Cities

 

 

 

 

 

 

“Death is Nature’s remedy for all things,”
― Charles Dickens, A Tale of Two Cities

 

 

 

 

 

 

“Scrooge was better than his word. He did it all, and infinitely more.”
― Charles Dickens, A Christmas Carol

 

 

 

 

 

 

“Have you got your flute with you?’ ‘Yes,’ he returned. ‘Have a blow at it,’ said the old woman, coaxingly. ‘Do!’ The Master, upon this, put his hand underneath the skirts of his coat, and brought out his flute in three pieces, which he screwed together, and began immediately to play. My impression is, after many years of consideration, that there never can have been anybody in the world who played worse.”
― Charles Dickens, David Copperfield

 

 

 

Charles Dickens Quotes Part 139

 

 

 

“She had given him her hand in an indifferent way that seemed habitual to her and spoke in a correspondingly indifferent manner, though in a very pleasant voice. She was as graceful as she was beautiful, perfectly self-possessed, and had the air, I thought, of being able to attract and interest any one if she had thought it worth her while. The keeper had brought her a chair on which she sat in the middle of the porch between us.”
― Charles Dickens, Bleak House

 

 

 

 

 

 

“Coming before me, on this particular evening that I mention, mingled with the childish recollections and later fancies, the ghosts of half-formed hopes, the broken shadows of disappointments dimly seen and understood, the blending of experience and imagination, incidental to the occupation with which my thoughts had been busy, it was more than commonly suggestive”
― Charles Dickens, David Copperfield

 

 

 

 

 

“As for the politicians, like everyone else in America, they were motivated by money, not ideals.”
― Charles Dickensv

 

 

 

 

 

 

“large jaw and a queen with a plain face, on the throne of England; there were a king with a large jaw and a queen with a fair face, on the throne of France. In both countries it was clearer”
― Charles Dickens, A Tale of Two Cities

 

 

 

Charles Dickens Quotes Part 139

 

 

“It’s not Madness, ma’am,’ replied Mr. Bumble, after a few moments of deep meditation. ‘It’s Meat.’ ‘What?’ exclaimed Mrs. Sowerberry. ‘Meat, ma’am, meat,’ replied Bumble, with stern emphasis. ‘You’ve over-fed him, ma’am.”
― Charles Dickens, Oliver Twist

 

 

 

 

 

 

“I think the best side of such people is almost hidden from us. What the poor are to the poor is little known, excepting to themselves and God.”
― Charles Dickens, Bleak House

 

 

 

 

 

 

“Some of the craftiest scoundrels that ever walked this earth, rather…that ever crawled and crept through life by its dirtiest and narrowest ways, will gravely jot down in diaries the events of every day, and keep a regular debtor and creditor acount with Heaven, which shall always show a floating balance in their own favour.”
― Charles Dickens

 

 

Charles Dickens Quotes Part 139

 

 

“The sunset struck so brilliantly into the travelling carriage when it gained the hill-top, that its occupant was steeped in crimson.”
― Charles Dickens, A Tale of Two Cities

 

 

 

 

 

“In Secret II. The Grindstone III. The Shadow IV. Calm in Storm”
― Charles Dickens, A Tale of Two Cities

 

 

 

 

 

“Don’t leave a stone unturned. It’s always something, to know you have done the most you could.”
― Dickens

 

 

 

 

 

 

“It was with extreme difficulty that Nipper, the black-eyed, who looked on steadfastly, contained herself at this crisis, and, until the subsequent departure of Mrs. Chick. But the nursery being at length free of visitors, she made herself some recompense for her late restraint.”
― Charles Dickens, Dombey and Son

 

 

 

Charles Dickens Quotes Part 139

 

 

“This was the life, and this the history, of the child of the Marshalsea at twenty-two. With a still surviving attachment to the one miserable yard and block of houses as her birthplace and home, she passed to and fro in it shrinkingly now, with a womanly consciousness that she was pointed out to every one. Since she had begun to work beyond the walls, she had found it necessary to conceal where she lived, and to come and go as secretly as she could, between the free city and the iron gates, outside of which she had never slept in her life. Her original timidity had grown with this concealment, and her light step and her little figure shunned the thronged streets while they passed along them. Worldly”
― Charles Dickens, Little Dorrit

 

 

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