Charles Dickens Quotes Part 132

Charles Dickens Quotes Part 132: Charles John Huffam Dickens was an English writer and social critic. He created some of the world’s best-known fictional characters and is regarded by many as the greatest novelist of the Victorian era.

His works enjoyed unprecedented popularity during his lifetime and, by the 20th century, critics and scholars had recognised him as a literary genius. His novels and short stories are widely read today.

 

Charles Dickens Quotes Part 132

Charles dickens quotes

 

 

“captain said and did was honestly according to his nature;”
― Charles Dickens, A Message from the Sea

 

 

 

 

 

“Substance of the Shadow XI. Dusk XII. Darkness XIII. Fifty-two XIV. The Knitting Done XV. The”
― Charles Dickens, A Tale of Two Cities

 

 

 

 

 

“When I said that I only came to see how Miss Havisham was, Sarah evidently deliberated whether or no she should send me about my business.”
― Charles Dickens, Great Expectations

 

 

 

 

 

 

“And who among the company at Monseigneur’s reception in that seventeen hundred and eightieth year of our Lord, could possibly doubt, that a system rooted in a frizzled hangman, powdered, gold-laced, pumped, and white-silk stockinged, would see the very stars out!”
― Charles Dickens, A Tale of Two Cities

 

 

 

Charles Dickens Quotes Part 132

 

 

“An American gentleman in the after-cabin, who had been wrapped up in fur and oilskin the whole passage, unexpectedly appeared in a very shiny, tall, black hat, and constantly overhauled a very little valise of pale leather, which contained his clothes, linen, brushes, shaving apparatus, books, trinkets, and other baggage. He likewise stuck his hands deep into his pockets, and walked the deck with his nostrils dilated, as already inhaling the air of Freedom which carries death to all tyrants, and can never (under any circumstances worth mentioning) be breathed by slaves.”
― Charles Dickens, Martin Chuzzlewit

 

 

 

 

 

“and my first decided experience of the stupendous power of money was, that it had morally laid upon his back Trabb’s boy.”
― Charles Dickens, Great Expectations

 

 

 

 

 

“I need say nothing here, on the first head, because nothing can show better than my history whether that prediction was verified or falsified by the result.”
― Charles Dickens, David Copperfield

 

 

 

 

 

 

“I was not happy; but, thus far, I had faithfully set the seal upon the Past, and, thinking of her, pointing upward, thought of her as pointing to that sky above me, where, in the mystery to come, I might yet love her with a love unknown on earth, and tell her what the strife had been within me when I loved her here.”
― Charles Dickens, David Copperfield

 

 

Charles Dickens Quotes Part 132

 

 

“    In short, the wily old Jew had the boy in his toils. Having prepared his mind, by solitude and gloom, to prefer any society to the companionship of his own sad thoughts in such a dreary place, he was now slowly instilling into his soul the poison which he hoped would blacken it, and change its hue for ever.”
― Charles Dickens, Oliver Twist

 

 

 

 

 

 

“Now, Biddy,” said I, “I am very sorry to see this in you. I did not expect to see this in you. You are envious, Biddy, and grudging. You are dissatisfied on account of my rise in fortune, and you can’t help showing it.” “If you have the heart to think so,” returned Biddy, “say so. Say so over and over again, if you have the heart to think so.”
― Charles Dickens, Great Expectations

 

 

 

 

 

 

“Stop thief! Stop thief!’ There is a magic in the sound. The tradesman leaves his counter, and the car-man his waggon; the butcher throws down his tray; the baker his basket; the milkman his pail; the errand-boy his parcels; the school-boy his marbles; the paviour his pickaxe; the child his battledore. Away they run, pell-mell, helter-skelter, slap-dash: tearing, yelling, screaming, knocking down the passengers as they turn the corners, rousing up the dogs, and astonishing the fowls: and streets, squares, and courts, re-echo with the sound.”
― Charles Dickens, Oliver Twist

 

 

 

 

 

“streets, came nearer and nearer.”
― Charles Dickens, A Tale of Two Cities

 

 

 

Charles Dickens Quotes Part 132

 

 

“Si nos detenemos cada vez que oímos dar con el pie en alguna puerta a esa viajera que nunca se detiene, no haríamos mucho ruido en el mundo. ¡No! ¡Adelante! Por los malos caminos si no hay otros, por los buenos si se puede; pero ¡adelante! Saltemos por encima de todos los obstáculos para llegar a la meta.”
― Charles Dickens, David Copperfield

 

 

 

 

 

 

“Who is Mr. Jasper?”
Rosa turned aside her head in answering: “Eddy’s uncle, and my music-master.”
“You do not love him?”
“Ugh!” She put her hands up to her face, and shook with fear or horror.
“You know that he loves you?”
“O, don’t, don’t, don’t!” cried Rosa, dropping on her knees, and clinging to her new resource. “Don’t tell me of it! He terrifies me. He haunts my thoughts, like a dreadful ghost. I feel that I am never safe from him. I feel as if he could pass in through the wall when he is spoken of.” She actually did look round, as if she dreaded to see him standing in the shadow behind her.
“Try to tell me more about it, darling.”
“Yes, I will, I will. Because you are so strong. But hold me the while, and stay with me afterwards.”
“My child! You speak as if he had threatened you in some dark way.”
“He has never spoken to me about – that. Never.”
“What has he done?”
“He has made a slave of me with his looks. He has forced me to understand him, without his saying a word; and he has forced me to keep silence, without his uttering a threat. When I play, he never moves his eyes from my hands. When I sing, he never moves his eyes from my lips. When he corrects me, and strikes a note, or a chord, or plays a passage, he himself is in the sounds, whispering that he pursues me as a lover, and commanding me to keep his secret. I avoid his eyes, but he forces me to see them without looking at them. Even when a glaze comes over them (which is sometimes the case), and he seems to wander away into a frightful sort of dream in which he threatens most, he obliges me to know it, and to know that he is sitting close at my side, more terrible to me than ever.”
“What is this imagined threatening, pretty one? What is threatened?”
“I don’t know. I have never even dared to think or wonder what it is.”
“And was this all, to-night?”
“This was all; except that to-night when he watched my lips so closely as I was singing, besides feeling terrified I felt ashamed and passionately hurt. It was as if he kissed me, and I couldn’t bear it, but cried out. You must never breathe this to any one. Eddy is devoted to him. But you said to-night that you would not be afraid of him, under any circumstances, and that gives me – who am so much afraid of him – courage to tell only you. Hold me! Stay with me! I am too frightened to be left by myself.”
― Charles Dickens, The Mystery of Edwin Drood

 

 

Charles Dickens Quotes Part 132

 

 

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