Charles Dickens Quotes Part 130

Charles Dickens Quotes Part 130: Charles John Huffam Dickens was an English writer and social critic. He created some of the world’s best-known fictional characters and is regarded by many as the greatest novelist of the Victorian era.

His works enjoyed unprecedented popularity during his lifetime and, by the 20th century, critics and scholars had recognised him as a literary genius. His novels and short stories are widely read today.

 

Charles Dickens Quotes Part 130

Charles dickens quotes

 

 

“O! there are many kinds of pride,” said Biddy, looking full at me and shaking her head; “pride is not all of one kind—”
― Charles Dickens, Great Expectations

 

 

 

 

 

“But before he composed himself for a nap, Mr Pecksniff delivered a kind of grace after meat, in these words: ‘The process of digestion, as I have been informed by anatomical friends, is one of the most wonderful works of nature. I do not know how it may be with others, but it is a great satisfaction to me to know, when regaling on my humble fare, that I am putting in motion the most beautiful machinery with which we have any acquaintance. I really feel at such times as if I was doing a public service. When I have wound myself up, if I may employ such a term,’ said Mr Pecksniff with exquisite tenderness, ‘and know that I am Going, I feel that in the lesson afforded by the works within me, I am a Benefactor to my Kind!’ As nothing”
― Charles Dickens, Martin Chuzzlewit

 

 

 

 

 

 

“It was the Dover road that lay, on a Friday night late in November, before the first of the persons with whom this history has business.”
― Charles Dickens, A Tale of Two Cities

 

 

 

 

 

“on the throne of France. In both countries it was clearer than crystal to the lords of the State preserves of loaves and fishes, that things in general were settled for ever. It was the year of Our Lord one thousand seven hundred and seventy-five.”
― Charles Dickens, A Tale of Two Cities

 

 

Charles Dickens Quotes Part 130

 

 

 

“And numerous indeed are the hearts to which Christmas brings a brief season of happiness and enjoyment. How many families, whose members have been dispersed and scattered far and wide, in the restless struggles of life, are then reunited, and meet once again in that happy state of companionship and mutual goodwill, which is a source of such pure and unalloyed delight; and one so incompatible with the cares and sorrows of the world, that the religious belief of the most civilised nations, and the rude traditions of the roughest savages, alike number it among the first joys of a future condition of existence, provided for the blessed and happy! How many old recollections, and how many dormant sympathies, does Christmas time awaken!

We write these words now, many miles distant from the spot at which, year after year, we met on that day, a merry and joyous circle. Many of the hearts that throbbed so gaily then, have ceased to beat; many of the looks that shone so brightly then, have ceased to glow; the hands we grasped, have grown cold; the eyes we sought, have hid their lustre in the grave; and yet the old house, the room, the merry voices and smiling faces, the jest, the laugh, the most minute and trivial circumstances connected with those happy meetings, crowd upon our mind at each recurrence of the season, as if the last assemblage had been but yesterday! Happy, happy Christmas, that can win us back to the delusions of our childish days; that can recall to the old man the pleasures of his youth; that can transport the sailor and the traveller, thousands of miles away, back to his own fireside and his quiet home!”
― Charles Dickens, The Pickwick Papers

 

 

 

 

 

 

“The great principle of out-of-door relief is, to give the paupers exactly what they don’t want; and then they get tired of coming.”
― Charles Dickens, Oliver Twist

 

 

 

 

 

“In a word, I was too cowardly to do what I knew to be right, as I had been too cowardly to avoid doing what I knew to be wrong. I”
― Charles Dickens, Great Expectations

 

 

 

 

Charles Dickens Quotes Part 130

 

 

“The poulterers’ shops were still half open, and the fruiterers’ were radiant in their glory. There were great, round, pot-bellied baskets of chestnuts, shaped like the waistcoats of jolly old gentleman, lolling at the doors, and tumbling out into the street in their apoplectic opulence. There were ruddy, brown-faced broad-girthed Spanish onions, shining in the fatness of their growth like Spanish friars, and winking from their shelves in wanton slyness at the girls as they went by, and glanced demurely at the hung-up mistletoe. There were pears and apples, clustered high in blooming pyramids; there were bunches of grapes, made, in the shopkeepers’ benevolence, to dangle from conspicuous hooks, that people’s mouths might water gratis as they passed; there were piles of filberts, mossy and brown, recalling, in their fragrance, ancient walks among the woods, and pleasant shufflings ankle deep through withered lanes; there were Norfolk Biffins, squab and swarthy, setting off the yellow of the oranges and lemons, and, in the great compactness of their juicy persons, urgently entreating and beseeching to be carried home in paper bags and eaten after dinner.”
― Charles Dickens, A Christmas Carol

 

 

 

 

 

 

“The change was made in me; the thing was done. Well or ill done, excusably or inescusably, it was done.”
― Charles Dickens, Great Expectations

 

 

 

 

 

 

“a spectacle of imbecility only to be equalled by himself.”
― Charles Dickens, Great Expectations

 

 

Charles Dickens Quotes Part 130

 

 

“I have seen you give him looks and smiles this very night, such as you never give to—me.”
“Do you want me then,” said Estella, turning suddenly with a fixed and serious, if not angry look, “to deceive and entrap you?”
“Do you deceive and entrap him, Estella?”
“Yes, and many others—all of them but you.”
― Charles Dickens, Great Expectations

 

 

 

 

 

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