Charles Dickens Quotes Part 126

Charles Dickens Quotes Part 126: Charles John Huffam Dickens was an English writer and social critic. He created some of the world’s best-known fictional characters and is regarded by many as the greatest novelist of the Victorian era.

His works enjoyed unprecedented popularity during his lifetime and, by the 20th century, critics and scholars had recognised him as a literary genius. His novels and short stories are widely read today.

 

Charles Dickens Quotes Part 126

Charles dickens quotes

 

 

“Don’t I what?’ said Peg. ‘Love your old master too much—’ ‘No, not a bit too much,’ said Peg.”
― Charles Dickens, Nicholas Nickleby

 

 

 

 

 

“I was born with a caul, which was advertised for sale, in the newspapers, at the low price of fifteen guineas. Whether”
― Charles Dickens, David Copperfield

 

 

 

 

 

“Nuevamente la calle volvió a su estado habitual, de que saliera un momento, y quedó triste, fría, sucia, llena de enfermedades y de miseria, de ignorancia y de hambre.”
― Charles Dickens, Historia de dos ciudades

 

 

 

 

 

“Hold!”
― Charles Dickens, A Tale of Two Cities

 

 

 

Charles Dickens Quotes Part 126

 

 

“I’m pretty well. So’s the family, and so’s the boys, except for a sort of rash as is a running through the school, and rather puts ’em off their feed. But it’s a ill wind as blows no good to nobody; that’s what I always say when them lads has a wisitation. A wisitation, sir, is the lot of mortality. Mortality itself, sir, is a wisitation. The world is chock full of wisitations; and if a boy repines at a wisitation and makes you uncomfortable with his noise, he must have his head punched. That’s going according to the Scripter, that is.”
― Charles Dickens, Nicholas Nickleby

 

 

 

 

 

“But its the same with any life. Imagine one selected day struck out of it and think how different its course would have been. Pause you who read this and think for a moment of the long chain of iron or gold, of thorns or flowers, that would never have bound you but for the formation of the first link on one memorable day.”
― Charles Dickens, Great Expectations

 

 

 

 

 

“Away, with a shriek, and a roar, and a rattle, from the town, burrowing among the dwellings of men and making the streets hum, flashing out into the meadows for a moment, mining in through the damp earth, booming on in darkness and heavy air, bursting out again into the sunny day so bright and wide; away, with a shriek, and a roar, and a rattle, through the fields, through the woods, through the corn, through the hay, through the chalk, through the mould, through the clay, through the rock, among objects close at hand and almost in the grasp, ever flying from the traveller, and a deceitful distance ever moving slowly with him: like as in the track of the remorseless monster, Death!”
― Charles Dickens, Dombey and Son

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

“Mr. Blotton, indeed—and the name will be doomed to the undying contempt of those who cultivate the mysterious and the sublime—Mr. Blotton, we say, with the doubt and cavilling peculiar to vulgar minds, presumed to state a view of the case, as degrading as ridiculous. Mr. Blotton, with a mean desire to tarnish the lustre of the immortal name of Pickwick, actually undertook a journey to Cobham in person, and on his return, sarcastically observed in an oration at the club, that he had seen the man from whom the stone was purchased; that the man presumed the stone to be ancient, but solemnly denied the antiquity of the inscription—inasmuch as he represented it to have been rudely carved by himself in an idle mood, and to display letters intended to bear neither more or less than the simple construction of—’BILL STUMPS, HIS MARK’; and that Mr. Stumps, being little in the habit of original composition, and more accustomed to be guided by the sound of words than by the strict rules of orthography, had omitted the concluding ‘L’ of his Christian name.”
― Charles Dickens, The Pickwick Papers

 

 

Charles Dickens Quotes Part 126

 

 

 

“He described it as if he were there, and it was evident that he saw it vividly; perhaps he had not seen much in his life.”
― Charles Dickens, A Tale of Two Cities

 

 

 

 

 

 

“Conscience is a dreadful thing when it accuses man or boy;”
― Charles Dickens, Great Expectations

 

 

 

 

 

 

“What Mr Chivery thought of these things, or how much or how little he knew about them, was never gathered from himself. It has been already remarked that he was a man of few words; and it may be here observed that he had imbibed a professional habit of locking everything up.”
― Charles Dickens, Little Dorrit

 

 

 

 

 

 

“XXII. The Sea Still Rises XXIII. Fire Rises XXIV. Drawn to the Loadstone Rock”
― Charles Dickens, A Tale of Two Cities

 

 

 

Charles Dickens Quotes Part 126

 

 

“Years Later II. A Sight III. A Disappointment IV. Congratulatory V. The Jackal VI. Hundreds of People”
― Charles Dickens, A Tale of Two Cities

 

 

 

 

 

 

“«Ci sono molte cose, credo, che possono avermi fatto del bene senza che io ne abbia ricavato un profitto», replicò il nipote, «e Natale è una di queste. Ma sono sicuro che ho sempre considerato il periodo natalizio, quando è venuto — a prescindere dalla venerazione dovuta al suo nome e alla sua origine sacra, ammesso che qualcosa che si riferisca possa esser tenuta separata da questa venerazione — come buono; un periodo di gentilezza, di perdono, di carità, di gioia; l’unico periodo che io conosca, in tutto il lungo calendario di un anno, nel quale uomini e donne sembrano concordi nello schiudere liberamente i cuori serrati e nel pensare alla gente che è al disotto di loro come se si trattasse realmente di compagni nel viaggio verso la tomba, e non di un’altra razza di creature in viaggio verso altre mete. E per questo, zio, anche se il Natale non mi ha mai fatto entrare in tasca una moneta d’oro, e neanche d’argento, credo che mi abbia fatto bene e che mi farà bene, e chiedo che Dio lo benedica».”
― Charles Dickens, A Christmas Carol and Other Christmas Stories: Christmas Festivities, The Story of the Goblins Who Stole a Sexton, A Christmas Tree, The Seven Poor Travellers, The Haunted Man, and Master Humphrey’s Clock

 

 

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