Charles Dickens Quotes Part 125

Charles Dickens Quotes Part 125: Charles John Huffam Dickens was an English writer and social critic. He created some of the world’s best-known fictional characters and is regarded by many as the greatest novelist of the Victorian era.

His works enjoyed unprecedented popularity during his lifetime and, by the 20th century, critics and scholars had recognised him as a literary genius. His novels and short stories are widely read today.

 

Charles Dickens Quotes Part 125

Charles dickens quotes

 

 

“those questions at sufficient length. If a dread of not being understood be hidden in the breasts of other young people to anything like the extent to which it used to be hidden in mine,—which I consider probable, as I have no particular reason to suspect myself of having been a monstrosity,—it is the key to many reservations. I felt convinced that if I described Miss Havisham’s as my eyes had seen it, I should not be understood.”
― Charles Dickens, Great Expectations

 

 

 

 

 

 

“to surpass the unutterable despair expressed in that one chorus, ‘Go where glory waits thee!’ It was a requiem, a dirge, a moan, a howl, a wail, a lament, an abstract of everything that is sorrowful and hideous in sound.”
― Charles Dickens, Martin Chuzzlewit

 

 

 

 

 

 

“There’s more of gravy than of grave about you, whatever you are!”
― Charles Dickens

 

 

 

 

 

 

“a man must take the fat with the lean; that’s what he must make up his mind to, in this life.”
― Charles Dickens, David Copperfield

 

 

 

Charles Dickens Quotes Part 125

 

 

“and to the left, very little altered if at all, except that the walls were lowered when the place got free; will look upon rooms in which the debtors lived; and will stand among the crowding ghosts of many miserable years. In the Preface to Bleak House I remarked”
― Charles Dickens, Little Dorrit

 

 

 

 

 

“You villain,’ said I, ‘what do you mean by entrapping me into your schemes? How dare you appeal to me just now, you false rascal, as if we had been in discussion together?”
― Charles Dickens, David Copperfield

 

 

 

 

 

 

“they had a weazen little baby, with a heavy head that it couldn’t hold up, and two weak staring eyes, with which it seemed to be always wondering why it had ever been born. It”
― Charles Dickens, David Copperfield

 

 

 

 

 

 

“However, the Bleeding Hearts were kind hearts; and when they saw the little fellow cheerily limping about with a good-humoured face, doing no harm, drawing no knives, committing no outrageous immoralities, living chiefly on farinaceous and milk diet, and playing with Mrs Plornish’s children of an evening, they began to think that although he could never hope to be an Englishman, still it would be hard to visit that affliction on his head. They began to accommodate themselves to his level, calling him ‘Mr Baptist,’ but treating him like a baby, and laughing immoderately at his lively gestures and his childish English—more, because he didn’t mind it, and laughed too. They spoke to him in very loud voices as if he were stone deaf. They constructed sentences, by way of teaching him the language in its purity, such as were addressed by the savages to Captain Cook, or by Friday to Robinson Crusoe. Mrs Plornish was particularly ingenious in this art; and attained so much celebrity for saying ‘Me ope you leg well soon,’ that it was considered in the Yard but a very short remove indeed from speaking Italian. Even Mrs Plornish herself began to think that she had a natural call towards that language. As he became more popular, household objects were brought into requisition for his instruction in a copious vocabulary; and whenever he appeared in the Yard ladies would fly out at their doors crying ‘Mr Baptist—tea-pot!’ ‘Mr Baptist—dust-pan!’ ‘Mr Baptist—flour-dredger!’ ‘Mr Baptist—coffee-biggin!’ At the same time exhibiting those articles, and penetrating him with a sense of the appalling difficulties of the Anglo-Saxon tongue.”
― Charles Dickens, Little Dorrit

 

 

 

Charles Dickens Quotes Part 125

 

 

“In consideration of the day and hour of my birth, it was declared by the nurse, and by some sage women in the neighbourhood who had taken a lively interest in me several months before there was any possibility of our becoming personally”
― Charles Dickens, David Copperfield

 

 

 

 

 

“Thank Heaven that the temples of such spirits are not made with hands, and that they may be even more worthily hung with poor patch-work than with purple and fine linen!”
― Charles Dickens, The Old Curiosity Shop

 

 

 

 

 

 

“chafed the hands that held his arm. “There, there, there! See”
― Charles Dickens, A Tale of Two Cities

 

 

 

 

 

 

“graminivorous”
― Charles Dickens, David Copperfield

 

 

Charles Dickens Quotes Part 125

 

 

“There is prodigious strength,’ I answered him, ‘in sorrow and despair.”
― Charles Dickens, A Tale of Two Cities

 

 

 

 

 

 

“Nobody was hard with him or with me. There was duty to be done, and it was done, but not harshly.”
― Charles Dickens, Great Expectations

 

 

 

 

 

“Days XIX. An Opinion XX. A Plea XXI. Echoing Footsteps”
― Charles Dickens, A Tale of Two Cities

 

 

 

 

 

 

“«Natale una fesseria, zio?», disse il nipote di Scrooge; «sono sicuro che non pensi una cosa simile».
«Certo che la penso», disse Scrooge. «Buon Natale! Che diritto hai tu di essere allegro? Che ragione hai tu di essere allegro? Sei povero abbastanza».
«Andiamo, via», rispose allegro il nipote. «Che diritto hai tu di essere triste? Che ragione hai tu di essere scontento? Sei ricco abbastanza».”
― Charles Dickens, A Christmas Carol and Other Christmas Stories: Christmas Festivities, The Story of the Goblins Who Stole a Sexton, A Christmas Tree, The Seven Poor Travellers, The Haunted Man, and Master Humphrey’s Clock

 

 

Charles Dickens Quotes Part 125

 

 

 

“In the little world in which children have their existence whosoever brings them up, there is nothing so finely perceived and so finely felt as injustice. He may be only small injustice that the child can be exposed to; but the child is small, and its world is small, and its rocking-horse stance as many hands high according to scale, as a big-boned Irish hunter.”
― Charles Dickens, Great Expectations

 

 

 

 

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