Charles Dickens Quotes Part 120

Charles Dickens Quotes Part 120: Charles John Huffam Dickens was an English writer and social critic. He created some of the world’s best-known fictional characters and is regarded by many as the greatest novelist of the Victorian era.

His works enjoyed unprecedented popularity during his lifetime and, by the 20th century, critics and scholars had recognised him as a literary genius. His novels and short stories are widely read today.

 

Charles Dickens Quotes Part 120

Charles dickens quotes

 

 

“We were very happy; and that evening, as the last of its race, and destined evermore to close that volume of my life, will never pass out of my memory.”
― Charles Dickens, David Copperfield

 

 

 

 

 

“found Mr. Waterbrook to be a middle-aged gentleman, with a short throat, and a good deal of shirt-collar, who only wanted a black nose to be the portrait of a pug-dog.”
― Charles Dickens, David Copperfield

 

 

 

 

 

 

“Oh, captive, bound, and double-chained!” cried the phantom, “who does not understand the toll of a lifetime of incessant labor by man, an immortal creature! For this flesh must pass into eternity before the good of which it is capable can be understood. How tragic not to know that a Christian spirit working kindly in its little realm of influence, whatever it may be, will find its mortal life too short for the vast opportunities it has to be useful. Not to know that no regret can ever make amends for one missed life’s opportunity! Yet such was I! Oh, such was I!”
― Charles Dickens, A Christmas Carol

 

 

Charles Dickens Quotes Part 120

 

 

“I shall always tell you everything.”
― Charles Dickens, Great Expectations

 

 

 

 

 

“Let us leave our old friend in one of those moments of unmixed happiness, of which, if we seek them, there are ever some, to cheer our transitory existence here. There are dark shadows on the earth, but its lights are stronger in the contrast. Some men, like bats or owls, have better eyes for the darkness than for the light. We, who have no such optical powers, are better pleased to take our last parting look at the visionary companions of many solitary hours, when the brief sunshine of the world is blazing full upon them.”
― Charles Dickens, The Complete Works of Charles Dickens

 

 

 

 

 

 

“Mr Pumblechook’s premises in the High-street of the market town, were of a peppercorny and farinaceous character, as the premises of a corn-chandler and seedsman should”
― Charles Dickens, Great Expectations

 

 

 

 

 

 

“Whenever I have not had you, Agnes, to advise and approve in the beginning, I have seemed to go wild, and to get into all sorts of difficulty. When I have come to you, at last (as I have always done), I have come to peace and happiness. I come home, now, like a tired traveller, and find such a blessed sense of rest!” I”
― Charles Dickens, David Copperfield

 

 

Charles Dickens Quotes Part 120

 

 

 

“IN SUCH RISINGS of fire and risings of sea—the firm earth shaken by the rushes of an angry ocean which had now no ebb, but was always on the flow, higher and higher, to the terror and wonder of the beholders on the shore—three years of tempest were consumed.”
― Charles Dickens, A Tale of Two Cities

 

 

 

 

 

“Repression is the only lasting philosophy. The dark deference of fear and slavery, my friend,” observed the Marquis, “will keep the dogs obedient to the whip,”
― Charles Dickens, A Tale of Two Cities

 

 

 

 

 

“In the first fright and horror of her situation, Miss Pross passed the body as far from it as she could, and ran down the stairs to call for fruitless help. Happily, she bethought herself of the consequences of what she did, in time to check herself and go back. It was dreadful to go in at the door again; but, she did go in, and even went near it, to get the bonnet and other things that she must wear. These she put on, out on the staircase, first shutting and locking the door and taking away the key. She then sat down on the stairs a few moments to breathe and to cry, and then got up and hurried away. By good fortune she had a veil on her bonnet, or she could hardly have gone along the streets without being stopped. By good fortune, too, she was naturally so peculiar in appearance as not to show disfigurement like any other woman. She needed both advantages, for the marks of gripping fingers were deep in her face, and her hair was torn, and her dress (hastily composed with unsteady hands) was clutched and dragged a hundred ways.”
― Charles Dickens, A Tale of Two Cities

 

 

 

Charles Dickens Quotes Part 120

 

 

 

“If great criminals told the truth—which, being great criminals, they do not—they would very rarely tell of their struggles against the crime. Their struggles are towards it. They buffet with opposing waves, to gain the bloody shore, not to recede from it.”
― Charles Dickens, Our Mutual Friend

 

 

 

 

 

“In the little world in which children have their existence whosoever brings them up, there is nothing so finely perceived and so finely felt, as injustice.”
― Charles Dickens, Great Expectations

 

 

 

 

 

 

“The fountain in the village flowed unseen and unheard, and the fountain at the chateau dropped unseen and unheard—both melting away, like the minutes that were falling from the spring of Time—through three dark hours. Then, the grey water of both began to be ghostly in the light, and the eyes of the stone faces of the chateau were opened.”
― Charles Dickens, A Tale of Two Cities

 

 

 

Charles Dickens Quotes Part 120

 

 

“London was decidedly overrated.”
― Charles Dickens, Great Expectations

 

 

 

 

 

“What alone was wanting to the realization of a vast fortune, he considered to be More Capital. Those were the two little words, more capital. Now”
― Charles Dickens, Great Expectations

 

 

 

 

SEE MORE:

Leave a Comment