Charles Dickens Quotes Part 119

Charles Dickens Quotes Part 119: Charles John Huffam Dickens was an English writer and social critic. He created some of the world’s best-known fictional characters and is regarded by many as the greatest novelist of the Victorian era.

His works enjoyed unprecedented popularity during his lifetime and, by the 20th century, critics and scholars had recognised him as a literary genius. His novels and short stories are widely read today.

 

Charles Dickens Quotes Part 119

Charles dickens quotes

 

 

“Oh, the river!…I know it’s like me…I know that I belong to it. I know that it’s the natural company of such as I am! It comes from country places, where there once was no harm in it—and it creeps through the dismal streets, defiled and miserable—and it goes away, like my life, to a great sea, that is always troubled—and I feel that I must go with it!”
― Charles Dickens, David Copperfield

 

 

 

 

 

“has that Copperfield no tague! I would do a good deal for you, if you tell me, without lying that somebody had cut it out”
― Charles Dickens, David Copperfield

 

 

 

 

 

“If he had been a man with strength of purpose to face those troubles and fight them, he might have broken the net that held him, or broken his heart; but being what he was, he languidly slipped into this smooth descent, and never more took one step upward.”
― Charles Dickens, Little Dorrit

 

 

Charles Dickens Quotes Part 119

 

 

“the English Crown and People, from a congress of British subjects in America: which, strange to relate, have proved more important to the human”
― Charles Dickens, A Tale of Two Cities

 

 

 

 

 

“The change was made in me; the thing was done. Well or ill done, excusably or inexcusably, it was done.”
― Charles Dickens, Great Expectations

 

 

 

 

 

 

“It isn’t that,” said Scrooge, heated by the remark, and speaking unconsciously like his former, not his latter, self. “It isn’t that, Spirit. He has the power to render us happy or unhappy; to make our service light or burdensome; a pleasure or a toil. Say that his power lies in words and looks; in things so slight and insignificant that it is impossible to add and count ’em up: what then? The happiness he gives, is quite as great as if it cost a fortune.”
― Charles Dickens, A Christmas Carol

 

 

 

 

 

“The whelp went home, and went to bed.  If he had had any sense of what he had done that night, and had been less of a whelp and more of a brother, he might have turned short on the road, might have gone down to the ill-smelling river that was dyed black, might have gone to bed in it for good and all, and have curtained his head for ever with its filthy waters.”
― Dickens Charles, Hard Times

 

 

 

Charles Dickens Quotes Part 119

 

 

“best of times,
it was the worst of times,
it was the age of wisdom,
it was the age of foolishness,
it was the epoch of belief,
it was the epoch of incredulity,
it was the season of Light,
it was the season of Darkness,
it was the spring of hope,
it was the winter of despair,”
― Charles Dickens, A Tale of Two Cities

 

 

 

 

 

 

“Why did I walk through crowds of fellow-beings with my eyes turned down, and never raise them to that blessed Star which led the Wise Men to a poor abode!”
― Charles Dickens, A Christmas Carol

 

 

 

 

 

“I believe the spreading of Catholicism to be the most horrible means of political and social degradation left in the world.”
― Charles Dickens

 

 

Charles Dickens Quotes Part 119

 

 

“I don’t know how it is,’ said Peggotty, ‘unless it’s on account of being stupid, but my head never can pick and choose its people. They come and they go, and they don’t come and they don’t go, just as they like. I wonder what’s become of her?”
― Charles Dickens, David Copperfield

 

 

 

 

 

“Hunger was pushed out of the tall houses, in the wretched clothing that hung upon poles and lines; Hunger was patched into them with straw and rag and wood and paper; Hunger was repeated in every fragment of the small modicum of firewood that the man sawed off; Hunger stared down from the smokeless chimneys, and started up from the filthy street that had no offal, among its refuse, of anything to eat. Hunger was the inscription on the baker’s shelves, written in every small loaf of his scanty stock of bad bread; at the sausage-shop, in every dead-dog preparation that was offered for sale. Hunger rattled its dry bones among the roasting chestnuts in the turned cylinder; Hunger was shred into atomics in every farthing porringer of husky chips of potato, fried with some reluctant drops of oil.”
― Charles Dickens, A Tale of Two Cities

 

 

 

 

 

“Even the blind men’s dogs appeared to know him; and when they saw him coming on, would tug their owners into doorways and up courts; and then would wag their tails as though they said, ‘No eye at all is better than an evil eye, dark master!”
― Charles Dickens, A Christmas Carol

 

 

Charles Dickens Quotes Part 119

 

 

 

“As the prospect gradually revealed itself and disclosed the scene over which the wind had wandered in the dark, like my memory over my life, I had a pleasure in discovering the unknown objects that had been around me in my sleep. At first they were faintly discernible in the mist, and above them the later stars still glimmered. That pale interval over, the picture began to enlarge and fill up so fast that at every new peep I could have found enough to look at for an hour. Imperceptibly my candles became the only incongruous part of the morning, the dark places in my room all melted away, and the day shone bright upon a cheerful landscape, prominent in which the old Abbey Church, with its massive tower, threw a softer train of shadow on the view than seemed compatible with its rugged character.”
― Charles Dickens, Bleak House

 

 

 

SEE MORE:

 

Leave a Comment