Charles Dickens Quotes Part 114

Charles Dickens Quotes Part 114: Charles John Huffam Dickens was an English writer and social critic. He created some of the world’s best-known fictional characters and is regarded by many as the greatest novelist of the Victorian era.

His works enjoyed unprecedented popularity during his lifetime and, by the 20th century, critics and scholars had recognised him as a literary genius. His novels and short stories are widely read today.

 

Charles Dickens Quotes Part 114

Charles dickens quotes

 

“un hecho maravilloso y digno de reflexionar sobre él, que cada uno de los seres humanos es un profundo secreto para los demás. A veces, cuando entro de noche en una ciudad, no puedo menos de pensar que cada una de aquellas casas envueltas en la sombra guarda su propio secreto; que cada una de las habitaciones de cada una de ellas encierra, también, su secreto; que cada corazón que late en los centenares de millares de pechos que allí hay, es, en ciertas cosas, un secreto para el corazón que más cerca de él late.”
― Charles Dickens, Historia de dos ciudades

 

 

 

 

 

“Her first proceeding there was to unlock a tall press, bring out several bottles, and pour some of the contents of each into my mouth. I think they must have been taken out at random, for I am sure I tasted aniseed water, anchovy sauce, and salad dressing.”
― Charles Dickens, David Copperfield

 

 

 

 

 

“How goes it, Jacques?” said one of these three to Monsieur Defarge. “Is all the spilt wine swallowed?” “Every drop, Jacques,”
― Charles Dickens, A Tale of Two Cities

 

 

 

Charles Dickens Quotes Part 114

 

“longer; it cannot deceive them too much.” Madame Defarge looked superciliously at the client, and nodded in confirmation. “As to you,” said she, “you would shout and shed tears for anything, if it made a show and a noise. Say! Would you not?” “Truly, madame, I think so. For the moment.” “If you were shown a great heap of dolls, and were set upon them to pluck them to pieces and despoil them for your own advantage, you would pick out the richest and gayest. Say! Would you not?” “Truly yes, madame.” “Yes. And if you were shown a flock of birds, unable to fly, and were set upon them to strip them of their feathers for your own advantage, you would set upon the birds of the finest feathers; would you not?” “It is true, madame.” “You have seen both dolls and birds to-day,” said Madame Defarge, with a wave of her hand towards the place where they had last been apparent; “now, go home!” XVI. Still Knitting Madame Defarge and monsieur her husband returned amicably to the bosom of Saint Antoine, while a speck in a blue cap toiled through the darkness, and through the dust, and down the weary miles of avenue by the wayside, slowly tending towards that point of the compass where the chateau of Monsieur the Marquis, now in his grave, listened to the whispering trees. Such ample leisure had the stone faces, now, for listening to the trees and to the fountain, that the few village scarecrows who, in their quest for herbs to eat and fragments of dead stick to burn, strayed within sight of the great stone courtyard and terrace staircase, had it borne in upon their starved fancy that the expression of the faces was altered. A rumour just lived in the village—had a faint and bare existence there, as its people had—that when the knife struck home, the faces changed, from faces of pride to faces of anger and pain; also, that when that dangling figure was hauled up forty feet above the fountain, they changed again, and bore a cruel look of being avenged, which they would henceforth bear for ever. In the stone face over the great window of the bed-chamber where the murder was done, two fine dints were pointed out in the sculptured nose, which everybody recognised, and which nobody had seen of old; and on the scarce occasions when two or three ragged peasants emerged from the crowd to take a hurried peep at Monsieur the Marquis petrified, a skinny finger would not have pointed to it for a minute, before they all started away among the moss and leaves, like the more fortunate hares who could find a living there. Chateau and hut, stone face and dangling figure, the red stain on the stone floor, and the pure water in the village well—thousands of acres of land—a whole province of France—all France itself—lay under the night sky, concentrated into a faint hair-breadth line. So does a whole world, with all its greatnesses and littlenesses, lie in a twinkling star. And as mere human knowledge can split a ray of light and analyse the manner of its composition, so, sublimer intelligences may read in the feeble shining of this earth of ours, every thought and act, every vice and virtue, of every responsible”
― Charles Dickens, A Tale of Two Cities

 

 

 

Charles Dickens Quotes Part 114

 

 

“He is the least suspicious of mankind; and whether that’s a merit, or whether it’s a blemish, it deserves consideration in all dealings with the Doctor, great or small.”
― Charles Dickens, David Copperfield

 

 

 

 

 

 

“Rarely did that hour of the evening come, rarely did I wake at night, rarely did I look up at the moon, or stars, or watch the falling rain, or hear the wind, but I thought of his solitary figure toiling on, poor pilgrim, and recalled the words: “I’m a-going to seek her, fur and wide. If any hurt should come to me, remember that the last words I left for her was, ‘My unchanged love is with my darling child, and I forgive her!”
― Charles Dickens, David Copperfield

 

Charles Dickens Quotes Part 114

 

 

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