Charles Dickens Quotes Part 113

Charles Dickens Quotes Part 113: Charles John Huffam Dickens was an English writer and social critic. He created some of the world’s best-known fictional characters and is regarded by many as the greatest novelist of the Victorian era.

His works enjoyed unprecedented popularity during his lifetime and, by the 20th century, critics and scholars had recognised him as a literary genius. His novels and short stories are widely read today.

 

Charles Dickens Quotes Part 113

Charles dickens quotes

 

“Whenever she was particularly discomposed, she always performed one of these pedestrian feats; and the amount of her discomposure might always be estimated by the duration of her walk.”
― Charles Dickens, David Copperfield

 

 

 

 

 

 

“I am, sir,’ said Mr Tigg, striking himself upon the breast, ‘a premium tulip, of a very different growth and cultivation from the cabbage Slyme, sir.”
― Charles Dickens, Martin Chuzzlewit

 

 

 

 

 

“Oh self, self, self! At every turn nothing but self!”
― Charles Dickens, Martin Chuzzlewit

 

 

 

 

 

“Next Mrs. Crupp said it was clear she couldn’t be in two places at once (which I felt to be reasonable). . .”
― Charles Dickens, David Copperfield

 

 

Charles Dickens Quotes Part 113

 

 

“I asked Mr. Spenlow what he considered the best sort of professional business? He replied, that a good case of a disputed will, where there was a neat little estate of thirty or forty thousand pounds, was, perhaps, the best of all. In such a case, he said, not only were there very pretty pickings, in the way of arguments at every stage of the proceedings, and mountains upon mountains of evidence on interrogatory and counter-interrogatory (to say nothing of an appeal lying, first to the Delegates, and then to the Lords), but, the costs being pretty sure to come out of the estate at last, both sides went at it in a lively and spirited manner, and expense was no consideration.”
― Charles Dickens, David Copperfield

 

 

 

 

 

“I whistled and made nothing of going. But the village was very peaceful and quiet, and the light mists were solemnly rising, as if to show me the world, and I had been so innocent and little there, and all beyond was so unknown and great, that in that moment with a strong heave and sob I broke into tears.”
― Charles Dickens

 

 

 

 

“And Ralph always wound up these mental soliloquies by arriving at the conclusion, that there was nothing like money.”
― Charles Dickens, Nicholas Nickleby

 

 

 

 

 

“Toby’s nose was very red, and his eye-lids were very red, and he winked very much, and his shoulders were very near his ears and his legs were very stiff, and altogether he was evidently a long way upon the frosty of cool.”
― Charles Dickens, The Chimes

 

 

Charles Dickens Quotes Part 113

 

 

“No. Has a dead man any use for money? Is it possible for a dead man to have money? What world does a dead man belong to? ‘Tother world. What world does money belong to? This world. How can money be a corpse’s? Can a corpse own it, want it, spend it, claim it, miss it? Don’t try to go confounding the rights and wrongs of things in that way. But it’s worthy of the sneaking spirit that robs a live man.”
― Charles Dickens, Our Mutual Friend

 

 

 

 

“I hope,’ said Mr. Pickwick, ‘that our volatile friend is committing no absurdities in that dickey behind.”
― Charles Dickens, The Pickwick Papers

 

 

 

 

 

“There have been sore mistakes; and my life has been a blind and thankless one; and I want forgiveness and direction far too much, to be bitter with you.”
― Charles Dickens, Great Expectations

 

 

“When the Attorney-General ceased, a buzz arose in the court as if a cloud of great blue-flies were swarming about the prisoner, in anticipation of what he was soon to become.”
― Charles Dickens, A Tale of Two Cities

 

 

Charles Dickens Quotes Part 113

 

 

“But, like many fond parents, I have in my heart of hearts a favourite child. And his name is David Copperfield”
― Charles Dickens

 

 

 

 

 

“He knew more of my intended career than I knew myself. I should be well enough educated for my destiny if I could “hold my own” with average young man in prosperous circumstances.”
― Charles Dickens, Great Expectations

 

 

 

 

“With that he turned to go, and walking, bareheaded, to the outside of the little porch, took leave of her with such a happy mixture of unconstrained respect and unaffected interest, as no breeding could have taught, no truth mistrusted, and nothing but a pure and single heart expressed.
Many half-forgotten emotions were awakened in the sister’s mind by this visit. It was so very long since any other visitor had crossed their threshold; it was so very long since any voice of apathy had made sad music in her ears; that the stranger’s figure remained present to her, hours afterwards, when she sat at the window, plying her needle; and his words seemed newly spoken, again and again. He had touched the spring that opened her whole life; and if she lost him for a short space, it was only among the many shapes of the one great recollection of which that life was made.”
― Charles Dickens, Dombey and Son

 

 

Charles Dickens Quotes Part 113

 

 

“Cash-up’s a very good expression,’ observed Martin, ‘when other people don’t apply it to you.”
― Charles Dickens, Martin Chuzzlewit

 

 

 

 

 

“Mr. Dick, listening with a face shining with pride and pleasure, in his heart of hearts, believed the Dictionary to be the most delightful book in the world. As I think of them going up and down before those school-room windows – the Doctor reading with his complacent smile, an occasional flourish of the manuscript, or grave motion of this head; and Mr. Dick listening, enchained by interest, with his poor wits calmly wandering who knows where, upon the wings of hard words – I think of it as one of the pleasantest things, in a quiet way, that I have ever seen. I feel as if they might go walking to and fro for ever, and the world might somehow be the better for it. As if a thousand things it makes a noise about, were not one-half so good for it, or me.”
― Charles Dickens, David Copperfield

 

 

 

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