Charles Dickens Quotes Part 111

Charles Dickens Quotes Part 111: Charles John Huffam Dickens was an English writer and social critic. He created some of the world’s best-known fictional characters and is regarded by many as the greatest novelist of the Victorian era.

His works enjoyed unprecedented popularity during his lifetime and, by the 20th century, critics and scholars had recognised him as a literary genius. His novels and short stories are widely read today.

 

Charles Dickens Quotes Part 111

Charles dickens quotes

 

“As Hamlet says, Hercules may lay about him with his club in every possible direction, but he can’t prevent the cats from making a most intolerable row on the roofs of the houses, or the dogs from being shot in the hot weather if they run about the streets unmuzzled”
― Charles Dickens, Martin Chuzzlewit

 

 

 

 

 

“My conduct, Pugstyles,’ said Mr Gregsbury, looking round upon the deputation with gracious magnanimity—’my conduct has been, and ever will be, regulated by a sincere regard for the true and real interests of this great and happy country. Whether I look at home, or abroad; whether I behold the peaceful industrious communities of our island home: her rivers covered with steamboats, her roads with locomotives, her streets with cabs, her skies with balloons of a power and magnitude hitherto unknown in the history of aeronautics in this or any other nation—I say, whether I look merely at home, or, stretching my eyes farther, contemplate the boundless prospect of conquest and possession—achieved by British perseverance and British valour—which is outspread before me, I clasp my hands, and turning my eyes to the broad expanse above my head, exclaim, “Thank Heaven, I am a Briton!”
― Charles Dickens, Nicholas Nickleby

 

 

 

 

 

“A wonderful fact to reflect upon, that every human creature is constituted to be that profound secret and mystery to every other. A solemn consideration, when I enter a great city by night, that every one of those darkly clustered houses encloses its own secret; that every room in every one of them encloses its own secret, that every beating heart in the hundreds of thousands of breasts there, is, in some of its imaginings, a secret to the heart nearest it!”
― Charles Dickens, A Tale of Two Cities

 

 

Charles Dickens Quotes Part 111

 

 

“The Mail III. The Night Shadows IV. The Preparation V. The Wine-shop VI. The Shoemaker Book the Second—the”
― Charles Dickens, A Tale of Two Cities

 

 

 

 

 

“Rooms get an awful look about them when they are fitted up, like these, for one person you are used to see in them, and that person is away under any shadow: let alone being God knows where.”
― Charles Dickens, Bleak House

 

 

 

 

 

“We strolled a long way, and loaded ourselves with things that we thought curious, and put some stranded starfish carefully back into the water—I hardly know enough of the race at this moment to be quite certain whether they had reason to feel obliged to us for doing so, or the reverse—and then made our way home to Mr. Peggotty’s dwelling.”
― Charles Dickens, David Copperfield

 

 

 

 

 

“I am afraid to think of what I might have done, on requirement, in the secrecy of my terror.”
― Charles Dickens, Great Expectations

 

 

Charles Dickens Quotes Part 111

 

 

“My sorrow may bear involuntary witness against you at the judgement Throne; but my angry thoughts or my reproaches never will, I know!”
― Charles Dickens, David Copperfield

 

 

 

 

 

“He was far from handsome certainly; and was drest in a snuff-coloured suit, of an uncouth make at the best, which, being shrunk with long wear, was twisted and tortured into all kinds of odd shapes; but notwithstanding his attire, and his clumsy figure, which a great stoop in his shoulders, and a ludicrous habit he had of thrusting his head forward, by no means redeemed, one would not have been disposed (unless Mr Pecksniff said so) to consider him a bad fellow by any means. He was perhaps about thirty, but he might have been almost any age between sixteen and sixty; being one of those strange creatures who never decline into an ancient appearance, but look their oldest when they are very young, and get it over at once.”
― Charles Dickens, Martin Chuzzlewit

 

 

 

 

 

 

“Mr. Gradgrind, apprised of his wife’s decease, made an expedition from London, and buried her in a business-like manner. He then returned with promptitude to the national cinder-heap, and resumed his sifting for the odds and ends he wanted, and his throwing of the dust about into they eyes of other people who wanted other odds and ends – in fact, he resumed his parliamentary duties.”
― Charles Dickens, Hard Times

 

 

 

 

 

“We made no more provision for growing older, than we did for growing younger.”
― Charles Dickens, David Copperfield

 

 

Charles Dickens Quotes Part 111

 

 

“´The common story, sir!” said Tom; “the story of a common mind. Your governess cannot win the confidence and respect of your children, forsooth! Let her begin by winning yours, and see what happens then.” . . . “When you tell me,” resumed Tom, who was not the less indignant for keeping himself quiet, “that my sister has no innate power of commanding the respect of your children, I must tell you it is not so; and that she has. She is as well bred, as well taught, as well qualified by nature to command respect, as any hirer of a governess you know. But when you place her at a disadvantage in reference to every servant in your house, how can you suppose, if you have the gift of common sense, that she is not in a tenfold worse position in reference to your daughters?”
― Charles Dickens, Martin Chuzzlewit

 

 

 

 

 

“You deepen the injury. It is sufficient already.”
― Charles Dickens, David Copperfield

 

 

 

Charles Dickens Quotes Part 111

 

 

“…if they would but think how hard it is for the very poor to have engendered in their hearts, that love of home from which all domestic virtues spring, when they live in dense and squalid masses where social decency is lost, or rather never found … and [those who rule] strive to improve the wretched dwellings in bye-ways where only Poverty may walk … In hollow voices from Workhouse, Hospital, and jail, this truth is preached from day to day, and has been proclaimed for years.”
― Charles Dickens, The Old Curiosity Shop

 

 

 

 

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