Charles Dickens Quotes Part 109

Charles Dickens Quotes Part 109: Charles John Huffam Dickens was an English writer and social critic. He created some of the world’s best-known fictional characters and is regarded by many as the greatest novelist of the Victorian era.

His works enjoyed unprecedented popularity during his lifetime and, by the 20th century, critics and scholars had recognised him as a literary genius. His novels and short stories are widely read today.

 

Charles Dickens Quotes Part 109

Charles dickens quotes

 

 

“Mrs. Varden was a lady of what is commonly called an uncertain temper – a phrase which being interpreted signifies a temper tolerably certain to make everybody more or less uncomfortable. Thus it generally happened, that when other people were merry, Mrs. Varden was dull; and that when other people were dull, Mrs. Varden was disposed to be amazingly cheerful. Indeed the worthy housewife was of such a capricious nature, that she not only attained a higher pitch of genius than Macbeth, in respect of her ability to be wise, amazed, temperate and furious, loyal and neutral in an instant, but would sometimes ring the changes backwards and forwards on all possible moods and flights in one short quarter of an hour; performing, as it were, a kind of triple bob major on the peal of instruments in the female belfry, with a skilfulness and rapidity of execution that astonished all who heard her.”
― Charles Dickens, Barnaby Rudge

 

 

 

 

 

“    Whether I shall turn out to be the hero of my own life, or whether that station will be held by anybody else, these pages must show. To”
― Charles Dickens, David Copperfield

 

 

 

 

 

“Are pistols with revolving barrels, sword-sticks, bowie-knives, and such things, Institutions on which you pride yourselves? Are bloody duels, brutal combats, savage assaults, shooting down and stabbing in the streets, your Institutions! Why, I shall hear next that Dishonour and Fraud are among the Institutions of the great republic!’ The”
― Charles Dickens, Martin Chuzzlewit

 

 

Charles Dickens Quotes Part 109

 

 

“I should not have minded that, if they would only have left me alone. But they wouldn’t leave me alone. They seemed to think the opportunity lost, if they failed to point the conversation at me, every now and then, and stick the point into me.”
― Charles Dickens

 

 

 

 

 

“You are part of my existence, part of myself. You have been in every line I have ever read since I first came here, the rough common boy whose poor heart you wounded even then.”
― Charles Dickens, Great Expectations

 

 

 

 

 

“The Fellow of No Delicacy XIV. The Honest Tradesman XV. Knitting XVI. Still Knitting XVII. One Night XVIII. Nine”
― Charles Dickens, A Tale of Two Cities

 

 

 

 

 

 

“Waste forces within him, and a desert all around, this man stood still on his way across a silent terrace, and saw for a moment, lying in the wilderness before him, a mirage of honourable ambition, self-denial, and perseverance. In the fair city of this vision, there were airy galleries from which the loves and graces looked upon him, gardens in which the fruits of life hung ripening, waters of Hope that sparkled in his sight. A moment, and it was gone. Climbing to a high chamber in a well of houses, he threw himself down in his clothes on a neglected bed, and its pillow was wet with wasted tears. Sadly, sadly, the sun rose; it rose upon no sadder sight than the man of good abilities and good emotions, incapable of their directed exercise, incapable of his own help and his own happiness, sensible of the blight on him, and resigning himself to let it eat him away. VI.”
― Charles Dickens, A Tale of Two Cities

 

 

Charles Dickens Quotes Part 109

 

 

“I labour under the same kind of astonishment to this day, having invariably observed that of all human weaknesses, the one to which our common nature is the least disposed to confess (I cannot imagine why) is the weakness of having gone to sleep in a coach.”
― Charles Dickens, David Copperfield

 

 

 

 

 

“She indulged in melancholy, that cheapest and most accessible of luxuries…”
― Charles Dickens

 

 

 

 

 

“In England, there was scarcely an amount of order and protection to justify much national boasting. Daring burglaries by armed men, and highway robberies, took place in the capital itself every night; families were publicly cautioned not to go out”
― Charles Dickens, A Tale of Two Cities

 

 

Charles Dickens Quotes Part 109

 

“He wouldn’t hear of anybody’s paying taxes, though he was very patriotic.”
― Charles Dickens, Great Expectations

 

 

 

 

 

 

“Mrs. Joe war eine sehr reinliche Hausfrau, doch sie verstand sich ausnehmend gut darauf, ihre Reinlichkeit bequemer und unerträglicher zu machen, als jeder Schmutz gewesen wäre. Die Reinlichkeit ist der Gottesfurcht verwandt, und manche verfahren mit ihrer Religion ganz genauso.”
― Charles Dickens, Great Expectations

 

 

 

 

 

“It was the best of times, it was the worst of times, it was the age of wisdom, it was the age of foolishness, it was the epoch of belief, it was the epoch of incredulity, …”
― Charles Dickens, A Tale of Two Cities

 

 

 

 

 

“The death close before me was terrible, but far more terrible than death was the dread of being misremembered after death”
― Charles Dickens, Great Expectations

 

 

Charles Dickens Quotes Part 109

 

 

“Molte sono le cose dalle quali io avrei potuto trarre del bene, e invece non ho saputo approfittarne, è vero” rispose il nipote. “E il Natale è una di quelle. Ma sono sicuro di aver sempre pensato al Natale, quando si avvicina, come a un giorno felice (a parte la venerazione dovuta alla sua sacra origine anche se di ciò si può non tener conto), un giorno di allegria, di bontà, di gentilezza, di indulgenza, di carità, l’unico momento nel lungo corso dell’anno nel quale uomini e donne sembrano disposti ad aprire liberamente il proprio cuore, disposti a pensare ai loro inferiori non come a creature di un’altra specie destinate a un altro cammino, ma come a compagni di viaggio, del medesimo viaggio verso la morte. E perciò, zio, benché non abbia mai portato una briciola d’oro o di argento nelle mie tasche, credo che il Natale mi abbia sempre fatto del bene, e sempre me ne farà; dico dunque: Sia benedetto!”.”
― Charles Dickens, Canto di Natale

 

 

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