Charles Dickens Quotes Part 104

Charles Dickens Quotes Part 104: Charles John Huffam Dickens was an English writer and social critic. He created some of the world’s best-known fictional characters and is regarded by many as the greatest novelist of the Victorian era.

His works enjoyed unprecedented popularity during his lifetime and, by the 20th century, critics and scholars had recognised him as a literary genius. His novels and short stories are widely read today.

 

Charles Dickens Quotes Part 104

Charles dickens quotes

 

“Persons don’t make their own faces, and it’s no more my fault if mine is a good one than it is other people’s fault if theirs is a bad one.”
― Charles Dickens, Nicholas Nickleby

 

 

 

 

“Although to restless and ardent minds, morning may be the fitting season for exertion and activity, it is not always at that time that hope is strongest or the spirit most sanguine and buoyant.”
― Charles Dickens

 

 

 

 

 

“Is it better to have had a good thing and lost it, or never have had it?”
― Charles Dickens, Our Mutual Friend

 

 

Charles Dickens Quotes Part 104

 

 

“Yours is a long life to look back upon, sir?”
― Charles Dickens, A Tale of Two Cities

 

 

 

 

“Twenty years back, yes; at this time of my life, no. For, as I draw closer and closer to the end, I travel in the circle, nearer and nearer to the beginning. It seems to be one of the kind smoothings and preparings of the way. My heart is touched now, by many remembrances that had long fallen asleep, of my pretty young mother (and I so old!), and by many associations of the days when what we call the World was not so real with me, and my faults were not confirmed in me.”
― Charles Dickens, A Tale of Two Cities

 

 

 

 

 

“On the steps of a church, awaiting the coming-up of the tumbrils, stands the Spy and prison-sheep. He looks into the first of them: not there. He looks into the second: not there. He already asks himself, “Has he sacrificed me?” when his face clears, as he looks into the third. “Which is Evremonde?” says a man behind”
― Charles Dickens, A Tale of Two Cities

 

 

 

 

 

“Ya estaba libre. Pero se había hecho tan semejante a la muerte durante la vida, que no supieron cuándo murió.”
― Charles Dickens, The Pickwick Papers

 

 

Charles Dickens Quotes Part 104

 

 

 

“At last the sun rose, and then my companions seemed to sleep easier. The difficulties under which they had laboured all night, and which had found utterance in the most terrific gasps and snorts, are not to be conceived. As the sun got higher, their sleep became lighter, and so they gradually one by one awoke. I recollect being very much surprised by the feint everybody made, then, of not having been to sleep at all, and by the uncommon indignation with which everyone repelled the charge. I labour under the same kind of astonishment to this day, having invariably observed that of all human weaknesses, the one to which our common nature is the least disposed to confess (I cannot imagine why) is the weakness of having gone to sleep in a coach.”
― Charles Dickens, David Copperfield

 

 

 

 

 

“How many crumpets, at a sittin’, do you think ‘ud kill me off at once?” says the patient. “I don’t know,” says the doctor. “Do you think half-a-crown’s wurth ‘ud do it?” says the patient. “I think it might,” says the doctor.”
― Charles Dickens, The Pickwick Papers

 

 

 

 

 

“The four hearse-horses, especially, reared and pranced, and showed their highest action, as if they knew a man was dead, and triumphed in it. “The break us, drive us, ride us; ill-treat, abuse, and maim us for their pleasure—But they die; Hurrah, they die!”
― Charles Dickens, Martin Chuzzlewit

 

 

 

 

 

“David Copperfield from head to foot! Calls a house a rookery when there’s not a rook near it, and takes the birds on trust, because he sees the nests!”
― Charles Dickens, David Copperfield

 

 

Charles Dickens Quotes Part 104

 

 

“Era el mejor de los tiempos, era el peor de los tiempos, la edad de la sabiduría, y también de la locura; la época de las creencias y de la incredulidad; la era de la luz y de las tinieblas; la primavera de la esperanza y el invierno de la desesperación.”
― Charles Dickens, Historia de dos ciudades

 

 

 

 

“All the six hundred and fifty-eight
members in the Commons House of Parliament of the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Ireland; who are strong lovers no doubt, but of their country only, which makes all the difference; for in a passion of that
kind (which is not always returned), it is the custom to use as many words as possible, and express nothing whatever.”
― Charles Dickens, Martin Chuzzlewit

 

 

 

 

 

“Esquecer a senhora? É parte da minha vida, parte de mim mesmo. Estava em cada verso que li, desde que aqui vim pela primeira vez, menino rude e comum, que a senhora, já naquele tempo, magoava tanto. Desde aquele tempo, esteve em todas as minhas esperanças… no rio, nas velas dos navios, no pântano, nos bosques, no mar, nas ruas. A senhora foi a personificação de todas as fantasias bonitas do meu espírito. As pedras que formam os edifícios mais fortes de Londres não são mais reais ou mais impossíveis de ser deslocadas pelas suas mãos, do que sua presença, sua influência, o foram para mim, sempre, aqui e em toda parte. Estella, até a hora em que eu morrer, a senhora vai ser parte do meu caráter, parte do pouco que há de bom em mim, e do que há de mal. Mas, ao nos separarmos, eu sempre irei associá-la com o bem, e é assim, com toda a lealdade, que pensarei na senhora, sempre, pois foi para mim um alento, mais do que um desalento, e agora deixe que eu sinta toda a minha dor. Que Deus a abençoe!”
― Charles Dickens, Great Expectations

 

 

Charles Dickens Quotes Part 104

 

 

 

“And O what a bright old song it is, that O ’tis love, ’tis love, ’tis love that makes the world go round!”
― Charles Dickens, Our Mutual Friend

 

 

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