Charles Dickens Quotes Part 103

Charles Dickens Quotes Part 103: Charles John Huffam Dickens was an English writer and social critic. He created some of the world’s best-known fictional characters and is regarded by many as the greatest novelist of the Victorian era.

His works enjoyed unprecedented popularity during his lifetime and, by the 20th century, critics and scholars had recognised him as a literary genius. His novels and short stories are widely read today.

 

Charles Dickens Quotes Part 103

Charles dickens quotes

 

 

“There seems a magic in the very name of Christmas.”
― Charles Dickens, A Christmas Carol and Other Christmas Writings

 

 

 

 

 

 

“speckled spiders, indolent and fat with long security, swing idly to and fro in the vibration of the bells, and never loose their hold upon their thread-spun castles in the air,”
― Charles Dickens, The Complete Christmas Books and Stories

 

 

 

 

 

“My dear Copperfield,” he replied. “To a man possessed of the higher imaginative powers, the objection to legal studies is the amount of detail which they involve. Even in our professional correspondence,” said Mr. Micawber, glancing at some letters he was writing, “the mind is not at liberty to soar to any exalted form of expression. Still, it is a great pursuit! A great pursuit!”
― Charles Dickens, David Copperfield

 

 

 

 

 

“He [Mr. Snagsby] is a mild, bald, timid man with a shining head and a scrubby clump of black hair sticking out at the back. He tends to meekness and obesity.”
― Charles Dickens, Bleak House

 

 

Charles Dickens Quotes Part 103

 

 

“The bird that can sing and won’t sing, must be made to sing, they say,’ grumbled Tackleton.”
― Charles Dickens, The Cricket on the Hearth

 

 

 

 

 

“Charles, throughout his imprisonment, had had to pay heavily for his bad food, and for his guard, and towards the living of the poorer prisoners.”
― Charles Dickens, A Tale of Two Cities

 

 

 

 

 

“The man slept on, indifferent to showers of hail and intervals of brightness, to sunshine on his face and shadow, to the pattering lumps of dull ice on his body and the diamonds into which the sun changed them, until the sun was low in the west, and the sky was glowing. Then, the mender of roads having got his tools together and all things ready to go down into the village, roused him.”
― Charles Dickens, A Tale of Two Cities

 

 

 

Charles Dickens Quotes Part 103

 

“Mr. Lorry came silently forward, leaving the daughter by the door. When he had stood, for a minute or two, by the side of Defarge, the shoemaker looked up. He showed no surprise at seeing another figure, but the unsteady fingers of one of his hands strayed to his lips as he looked at it (his lips and his nails were of the same pale lead-colour), and then the hand dropped to his work, and he once more bent over the shoe. The look and the action had occupied but an instant. “You have a visitor, you see,” said Monsieur Defarge. “What did you say?” “Here is a visitor.” The shoemaker looked up as before, but without removing a hand from his work. “Come!” said Defarge. “Here is monsieur, who knows a well-made shoe when he sees one. Show him”
― Charles Dickens, A Tale of Two Cities

 

 

 

 

 

 

“Quiet people avoid the question of the Presidency, for there will be a new election in three years and a half, and party feeling runs very high: the great constitutional feature of this institution being, that directly the acrimony of the last election is over, the acrimony of the next one begins;”
― Charles Dickens, The Complete Works of Charles Dickens
“Dear reader! It rests with you and me whether, in our two fields of action, similar things shall be or not. Let them be! We shall sit with lighter bosoms on the hearth, to see the ashes of our fires turn grey and cold.”
― Charles Dickens, Hard Times

 

 

 

“Lovely girls; bright women, brown-haired, black-haired, and grey; youths; stalwart men and old; gentle born and peasant born; all red wine for La Guillotine, all daily brought into light from the dark cellars of the loathsome prisons, and carried to her through the streets to slake her devouring thirst. Liberty, equality, fraternity, or death;—the last, much the easiest to bestow, O Guillotine!”
― Charles Dickens, A Tale of Two Cities

 

 

Charles Dickens Quotes Part 103

 

 

 

“To return to poor Darnay,” said Carton. “Don’t tell Her of this interview, or this arrangement. It would not enable Her to go to see him. She might think it was contrived, in case of the worst, to convey to him the means of anticipating the sentence.”
― Charles Dickens, A Tale of Two Cities

 

 

 

 

 

“Ah!’ he said, slowly turning his eyes towards me. ‘Well! If you was writin’ to her, p’raps you’d recollect to say that Barkis was willin’; would you?’ ‘That Barkis is willing,’ I repeated, innocently. ‘Is that all the message?’ ‘Ye-es,’ he said, considering. ‘Ye-es. Barkis is willin”
― Charles Dickens

 

 

 

 

 

“Martin knew nothing about America, or he would have known perfectly well that if its individual citizens, to a man, are to be believed, it always is depressed, and always is stagnated, and always is at an alarming crisis, and never was otherwise; though as a body they are ready to make oath upon the Evangelists at any hour of the day or night, that it is the most thriving and prosperous of all countries on the habitable globe.”
― Charles Dickens, Martin Chuzzlewit

 

 

 

 

 

“If he was only sorry, he wouldn’t look at me as he does. I am only sorry, and it makes me feel kinder.”
― Charles Dickens, David Copperfield

 

 

Charles Dickens Quotes Part 103

 

 

“A man in public life expects to be sneered at—it is the fault of his elewated sitiwation, and not of himself.”
― Charles Dickens, Nicholas Nickleby

 

 

 

 

 

“In the little world in which children have their existence whosoever brings them up, there is nothing so finely perceived and so finely felt as injustice.”
― Charles Dickens, Great Expectations

 

 

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