Charles Dickens Quotes Part 101

Charles Dickens Quotes Part 101: Charles John Huffam Dickens was an English writer and social critic. He created some of the world’s best-known fictional characters and is regarded by many as the greatest novelist of the Victorian era.

His works enjoyed unprecedented popularity during his lifetime and, by the 20th century, critics and scholars had recognised him as a literary genius. His novels and short stories are widely read today.

 

Charles Dickens Quotes Part 101

Charles dickens quotes

 

 

“Let me remember how it used to be, and bring one morning back again.”
― Charles Dickens, David Copperfield

 

 

 

 

 

 

“Darkness closed around, and then came the ringing of church bells and the distant beating of the military drums in the Palace Courtyard, as the women sat knitting, knitting. Darkness encompassed them. Another darkness was closing in as surely, when the church bells, then ringing pleasantly in many an airy steeple over France, should be melted into thundering cannon; when the military drums should be beating to drown a wretched voice, that night all potent as the voice of Power and Plenty, Freedom and Life. So much was closing in about the women who sat knitting, knitting, that they their very selves were closing in around a structure yet unbuilt, where they were to sit knitting, knitting, counting dropping heads.”
― Charles Dickens, A Tale of Two Cities

 

 

 

 

 

 

“Brag is a good dog, but Holdfast is a better.”
― Charles Dickens, Great Expectations

 

 

 

 

 

 

“There was once a king, and he had a queen; and he was the manliest of his gender, and she was the loveliest of hers. They had nineteen children, and were always having more.”
― Charles Dickens

 

 

 

Charles Dickens Quotes Part 101

 

 

 

“and a little blear-eyed, weazen-faced, ancient man came creeping out. He was of a remote fashion, and dusty, like the rest of the furniture; he was dressed in a decayed suit of black; with breeches garnished at the knees with rusty wisps of ribbon, the very paupers of shoestrings; on the lower portion of his spindle legs were dingy worsted stockings of the same colour. He looked as if he had been put away and forgotten half a century before,”
― Charles Dickens, Martin Chuzzlewit

 

 

 

 

 

 

“Two other passengers, besides the one, were plodding up the hill by the side of the mail. All three were wrapped to the cheekbones”
― Charles Dickens, A Tale of Two Cities

 

 

 

 

 

 

“It was sufficiently late in the year for the orchards to be ruddy with ripe apples; and in a few places the hop-pickers were already at work. I thought it all extremely beautiful, and made up my mind to sleep among the hops that night: imagining some cheerful companionship in the long perspectives of poles, with the graceful leaves twining”
― Charles Dickens, David Copperfield

 

 

 

 

 

 

“I am glad to recollect that when the carrier’s cart was at the gate, and my mother stood there kissing me, a grateful fondness for her and for the old place I had never turned my back upon before, made me cry.”
― Charles Dickens, David Copperfield

 

 

Charles Dickens Quotes Part 101

 

 

 

“I say, we were so robbed, and hunted, and were made so poor, that our father told us it was a dreadful thing to bring a child into the world, and that what we should pray for, was, that our women might be barren and our miserable race die out!”
― Charles Dickens, A Tale of Two Cities

 

 

 

 

 

“The mists had all solemnly risen now, and the world lay spread before me.”
― Charles Dickens, Great Expectations

 

 

 

 

 

 

“Before I draw nearer to that stone to which you point,” said Scrooge, “answer me one question. Are these the shadows of the things that Will be, or are they shadows of things that May be, only?” Still the Ghost pointed downward to the grave by which it stood. “Men’s courses will foreshadow certain ends, to which, if persevered in, they must lead,” said Scrooge. “But if the courses be departed from, the ends will change. Say it is thus with what you show me!”
― Charles Dickens, A Christmas Carol

 

 

 

 

 

 

“Mr. Bucket and his fat forefinger are much in consultation together under existing circumstances. When Mr. Bucket has a matter of this pressing interest under his consideration, the fat forefinger seems to rise, to the dignity of a familiar demon. He puts it to his ears, and it whispers information; he puts it to his lips, and it enjoins him to secrecy; he rubs it over his nose, and it sharpens his scent; he shakes it before a guilty man, and it charms him to his destruction.”
― Charles Dickens, Bleak House

 

 

 

Charles Dickens Quotes Part 101

 

 

“It was the best of times, it was the worst of times, it was the age of wisdom, it was the age of foolishness, it was the epoch of belief, it was the epoch of incredulity, it was the season of Light, it was the season of Darkness, it was the spring of hope,”
― Charles Dickens, A Tale of Two Cities

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

“The factory-bells had need to ring their loudest that morning to disperse the groups of workers who stood in the tardy daybreak, collected round the placards [wanted posters], devouring them with eager eyes. Not the least eager of the eyes assembled, were the eyes of those who could not read. These people, as they listened to the friendly voice that read aloud–there was always some such ready to help them–stared at the characters which meant so much with a vague awe and respect that would have been half ludicrous, if any aspect of public ignorance could ever be otherwise than threatening and full of evil.”
― Charles Dickens, Hard Times

 

 

 

 

 

“Your day is done. Night is coming fast for you.” – Nickolas Nickleby”
― Charles Dickens

 

 

 

 

 

 

“Emlékezetes napja maradt életemnek ez a nap, mert nagy változásokat okozott bennem. De ez a nap senki életéből nem hiányzik. Képzeljétek csak el, hogy egy bizonyos nap kiesett volna az életetekből, milyen másképp fordult volna minden.”
― Charles Dickens, Great Expectations

 

 

Charles Dickens Quotes Part 101

 

 

“doors of our house were—almost cruelly, it seemed to me sometimes—bolted and locked against it. An aunt of my father’s, and consequently a great-aunt of mine, of whom I shall have more to relate by and by, was the principal magnate of our family.”
― Charles Dickens, David Copperfield

 

 

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