Charles Dickens Quotes Part 100

Charles Dickens Quotes Part 100: Charles John Huffam Dickens was an English writer and social critic. He created some of the world’s best-known fictional characters and is regarded by many as the greatest novelist of the Victorian era.

His works enjoyed unprecedented popularity during his lifetime and, by the 20th century, critics and scholars had recognised him as a literary genius. His novels and short stories are widely read today.

 

Charles Dickens Quotes Part 100

Charles dickens quotes

 

 

“Hunger stared down from the smokeless chimneys, and started up from the filthy street that had no offal, among its refuse, of anything to eat. Hunger was the inscription on the baker’s shelves, written in every small loaf of his scanty stock of bad bread;”
― Charles Dickens, A Tale of Two Cities

 

 

 

 

 

“What is the matter?” asked the passenger, then, with mildly quavering speech. “Who wants me? Is it Jerry?”
― Charles Dickens, A Tale of Two Cities

 

 

 

 

 

“Get out of this office! I’ll have no feelings here.”
― Charles Dickens, Great Expectations

 

 

 

 

 

“G. K. Chesterton wrote in Charles Dickens, that The Pickwick Papers was neither a good novel nor a bad novel but in fact ‘not a novel at all.’ He believed it was “something nobler than a novel”. Certainly it was never conceived as a novel but merely as the letterpress to accompany the “cockney sporting plates”. Unfortunately Robert Seymour committed suicide after the first two instalments so the third one was undertaken by Robert Buss whose work Dickens did not like and consequently the task fell to Hablot Knight Browne, who took the name “Phiz” and continued an artistic relationship with Dickens, illustrating many of his novels.”
― Charles Dickens, The Complete Works of Charles Dickens

 

 

 

Charles Dickens Quotes Part 100

 

 

“lived principally on Dora and coffee. In my love-lorn condition, my appetite languished; and I was glad of it, for I felt as though it would have been an act of perfidy towards Dora to have a natural relish for my dinner.”
― Charles Dickens, David Copperfield

 

 

 

 

 

 

“I know enough of the world now, to have almost lost the capacity of being much surprised by anything; but it is matter of some surprise to me, even now, that I can have been so easily thrown away at such an age. A child of excellent abilities, and with strong powers of observation, quick, eager, delicate, and soon hurt bodily or mentally, it seems wonderful to me that nobody should have made any sign in my behalf. But none was made; and I became, at ten years old, a little labouring hind in the service of Murdstone and Grinby.”
― Charles Dickens, David Copperfield

 

 

 

 

 

“Blameless as I was, and knew that I was, in reference to any wrong she could possibly suspect me of, I shrunk before her strange eyes, quite unable to endure their hungry lustre.”
― Charles Dickens, David Copperfield

 

 

 

 

 

 

“It was but imagination, yet imagination had all the terrors of reality; nay, it was worse, for the reality would have come and gone, and there an end, but in imagination it was always coming, and never went away.”
― Charles Dickens, The Old Curiosity Shop

 

 

Charles Dickens Quotes Part 100

 

 

“But the windows of the house of Memory, and the windows of the house of Mercy, are not so easily closed as windows of glass and wood. They fly open unexpectedly; they rattle in the night; they must be nailed up. Mr. The Englishman had tried nailing them, but had not driven the nails quite home. So he passed but a disturbed evening and a worse night.”
― Charles Dickens, Christmas Stories

 

 

 

 

 

“conventional phrases are a sort of fireworks, easily let off, and liable to take a great variety of shapes and colours not at all suggested by their original form.”
― Charles Dickens, David Copperfield

 

 

 

 

 

 

“In such terms Mr. Gradgrind always mentally introduced himself, whether to his private circle of acquaintance, or to the public in general. In such terms, no doubt, substituting the words ‘boys and girls,’ for ‘sir,’ Thomas Gradgrind now presented Thomas Gradgrind to the little pitchers before him, who were to be filled so full of facts.”
― Charles Dickens, Hard Times

 

 

 

 

 

 

“When a waggon with a train of beautiful horses, furnished with red trappings and clear-sounding bells came by us with its music, I believe we could all three have sung to the bells, so cheerful were the influences around….
We had stopped, and the waggon had stopped too. Its music changed as the horses came to a stand, and subsided to a gentle tinkling, except when a horse tossed his head, or shook himself, and sprinkled off a little shower of bellringing.”
― Charles Dickens, Bleak House

 

 

 

Charles Dickens Quotes Part 100

 

 

“An ancient proverb warns us that we should not expect to find old heads upon young shoulders;”
― Charles Dickens, Martin Chuzzlewit

 

 

 

 

 

“It’s as well to be kind whenever one can;”
― Charles Dickens, Martin Chuzzlewit

 

 

 

 

 

“They asked me a good many questions; as, what my name was, how old I was, where I lived, how I was employed, and how I came there. To all of which, that I might commit nobody, I invented, I am afraid, appropriate answers. They served me with the ale, though I suspect it was not the Genuine Stunning; and the landlord’s wife, opening the little half-door of the bar, and bending down, gave me my money back, and gave me a kiss that was half admiring and half compassionate, but all womanly and good, I am sure.”
― Charles Dickens, David Copperfield

 

 

 

 

 

 

“I recollect it was settled by general consent that India was quite a misrepresented country, and had nothing objectionable in it, but a tiger or two, and a little heat in the warm part of the day.”
― Charles Dickens, David Copperfield

 

 

Charles Dickens Quotes Part 100

 

 

“I think I know the delights of freedom”
― Charles Dickens, Great Expectations

 

 

 

 

 

“The beautiful lady released her hold of Florence, and pressing her lips once more upon her face, withdrew hurriedly, and joined them. Florence remained standing in the same place: happy, sorry, joyful, and in tears, she knew not how, or how long, but all at once: when her new Mama came back, and took her in her arms again.”
― Charles Dickens, Dombey and Song

 

 

 

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